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Hey Guys, My house is now at the framing stage. I was wondering if there is anything I can do to stop the sound from HT leaking into bedroom2. I understand that it would be impossible to completely isolate the sound but I would be happy with whatever I can do to even muffle it. Please see the image to get a better idea, is there any kind of insulation I can put into the wall between HT and bed2? Thanks

 

Capture.JPG.17b8251480bfc5cf10bc4f9148ef97c6.JPG

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If I add the foam, will that make the room much narrow? its only 3.5 m wide as it is.

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The soundscreen internally would be your best bet, as it won't reduce room size.

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thanks guys, I will do that once the room is built.

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Without going to longer lengths, add acoustic batts in the internal wall now before the gyprock goes up. You can also use soundchek or fyrchek plasterboard (on both sides).

Do both of these now and then worry about internal treatment once the room is up.

Edited by Eli
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14 minutes ago, Eli said:

Without going to longer lengths, add acoustic batts in the internal wall now before the gyprock goes up. You can also use soundchek or fyrchek plasterboard.

Do both of these now and then worry about internal treatment once the room is up.

Agree!!!!

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Also looks like there isn't an actual door on the home theatre?

I'd be trying to get a solid core door installed.

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Sound transmission is a **** to eliminate/reduce with modern light density construction - i know as i work at this daily!

Sound is like water it will leak through anywhere it can...

http://www.gyprock.com.au/Pages/Solutions/Homes/Noise.aspx This is a good guide as a starting point. 

Unfortunately for steps to be effective they need to be done together as a system is only as good as it's weakest link!

There's no point adding dense acoustic insulation and heavy extra layers of plasterboard if you have an opening or standard hollow core door and single layer plate glass windows.

Also there's little point treating one wall if it stops at the ceiling (i.e doesn't run up to the roof line), if the ceiling is typical 10mm PB with standard cornice surrounds - this will be your transmission point.

Something is always better than nothing but I've seen plenty of people throw good money at haphazard solutions without addressing the system as a whole. Standard 10mm uninsulated walls and poor door and window choices are the tour de force among domestic builders and your best bet is to have a game plan before attempting a piecemeal solution.

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27 minutes ago, Eli said:

Also looks like there isn't an actual door on the home theatre?

I'd be trying to get a solid core door installed.

yeh, I will be speaking to the builder about how that can be done. that opening is 1.5 metre, dont know if doors come that wide.

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15 minutes ago, yamapro said:

Sound transmission is a **** to eliminate/reduce with modern light density construction - i know as i work at this daily!

Sound is like water it will leak through anywhere it can...

http://www.gyprock.com.au/Pages/Solutions/Homes/Noise.aspx This is a good guide as a starting point. 

Unfortunately for steps to be effective they need to be done together as a system is only as good as it's weakest link!

There's no point adding dense acoustic insulation and heavy extra layers of plasterboard if you have an opening or standard hollow core door and single layer plate glass windows.

Also there's little point treating one wall if it stops at the ceiling (i.e doesn't run up to the roof line), if the ceiling is typical 10mm PB with standard cornice surrounds - this will be your transmission point.

Something is always better than nothing but I've seen plenty of people throw good money at haphazard solutions without addressing the system as a whole. Standard 10mm uninsulated walls and poor door and window choices are the tour de force among domestic builders and your best bet is to have a game plan before attempting a piecemeal solution.

I will talk to the builder and try to get a solid core door fit in there.

what can I do about the window and roof?

can I put the accoustic foam on the roof too and get double glazed window?. The window is very big though 1800 x 2400 but I will be getting wall to wall curtain.

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Doors can come to any size imagineable!

Normally for an opening around that size you would install 2 single leaf 720mm wide doors - with the addition of the jamb set that will fill your opening. A single door is always a better option when trying to chase acoustic performance, although once you go wider than 1020mm they get pretty expensive and being that you would really want a solid core door, pretty damn heavy.

It should be relatively easy for the builder to 'shrink' the opening to accomodate a 1020mm wide door though if you are happy to lose some opening space. (For the record, when my wife and i built i selected a 1020 door to our entry and the sales consultant just didn't get it...once he saw it and saw how easy moving furniture in became he started selling these with most of his houses!)

Edited by yamapro

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11 minutes ago, yamapro said:

Doors can come to any size imagineable!

Normally for an opening around that size you would install 2 single leaf 720mm wide doors - with the addition of the jamb set that will fill your opening. A single door is always a better option when trying to chase acoustic performance, although pnce you go wider than 1020mm they get pretty expensive and being that you would really want a solid core door, pretty damn heavy.

It should be relatively easy for the builder to 'shrink' the opening to accomodate a 1020mm wide door though if you are hapy to lose some opening space. (For the record, when my wife and i built i selected a 1020 door to our entry and the sales consultant just didn't get it...once he saw it and saw how easy moving furniture in became he started selling these with most of his houses!)

Thanks for the advice mate, looks like it will have to be 2 doors. what about the roof and window?

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1 minute ago, Xxharry said:

I will talk to the builder and try to get a solid core door fit in there.

what can I do about the window and roof?

can I put the accoustic foam on the roof too and get double glazed window?. The window is very big though 1800 x 2400 but I will be getting wall to wall curtain.

The window would definitely be a great candidate for double glazing, your bedroom one too as they are pretty much side by side ;)

TBH it isn't really practical or cost effective to take wall linings up to the roof in domestic construction.

Depending on how flexible your builder is (most aren't very unfortunately) you could look at some or all of the following though:

1) Have the wall/ceiling junction 'square set' prior to cornicing - this will seal board right up to the corners. Typically ceilings will be sheeted with a 20-30mm gap back to the wall that the cornice will cover, if this can be avoided it's an advantage.

2) Use 13mm board instead of 10mm board to the walls and ceiling. If you can afford double layers to both even better. If you can upgrade the board to Fire Stop/ FyreChek better still.

3) Ask for 'SoundScreen' or similar insulation to the wall cavities.

4) Ideally batten one side of the wall out with furring channel on resilient mounts prior to sheeting.

I personally wouldn't worry about acoustic foam...it's more expensive and less effective at sound isolation than SoundScreen insulation or extra mass to the plasterboard and can easily be added at a later stage if desired. It may be effective at treating the acoustics in room - but that is another discussion :D

You are lucky in that the opening to the room is relatively isolated from the zone you want to minimise acoustic transmission to but the door advice stands. If possible upgrade to a 42-44mm door instead of the standard 35mm.

You will also want a good quality door seal - the Raven range are excellent and many can be 'plant on' as opposed to rebated in allowing DIY after hand over or you can engage a good carpenter at any stage.

http://www.raven.com.au/domino/raven/ravenweb.nsf/html-v/catalogue2

It can be a lot to absorb (excuse the pun) but it is worth looking at the hollistic approach now before spending any money!

Best of Luck

 

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17 hours ago, yamapro said:

The window would definitely be a great candidate for double glazing, your bedroom one too as they are pretty much side by side ;)

TBH it isn't really practical or cost effective to take wall linings up to the roof in domestic construction.

Depending on how flexible your builder is (most aren't very unfortunately) you could look at some or all of the following though:

1) Have the wall/ceiling junction 'square set' prior to cornicing - this will seal board right up to the corners. Typically ceilings will be sheeted with a 20-30mm gap back to the wall that the cornice will cover, if this can be avoided it's an advantage.

2) Use 13mm board instead of 10mm board to the walls and ceiling. If you can afford double layers to both even better. If you can upgrade the board to Fire Stop/ FyreChek better still.

3) Ask for 'SoundScreen' or similar insulation to the wall cavities.

4) Ideally batten one side of the wall out with furring channel on resilient mounts prior to sheeting.

I personally wouldn't worry about acoustic foam...it's more expensive and less effective at sound isolation than SoundScreen insulation or extra mass to the plasterboard and can easily be added at a later stage if desired. It may be effective at treating the acoustics in room - but that is another discussion :D

You are lucky in that the opening to the room is relatively isolated from the zone you want to minimise acoustic transmission to but the door advice stands. If possible upgrade to a 42-44mm door instead of the standard 35mm.

You will also want a good quality door seal - the Raven range are excellent and many can be 'plant on' as opposed to rebated in allowing DIY after hand over or you can engage a good carpenter at any stage.

http://www.raven.com.au/domino/raven/ravenweb.nsf/html-v/catalogue2

It can be a lot to absorb (excuse the pun) but it is worth looking at the hollistic approach now before spending any money!

Best of Luck

 

That is a lot of information bro but I am sure it would all make sense to my builder. Thanks heaps man

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I am currently building a new house too (only at slab stage at the moment), but here the steps I took for soundproofing in my HT:

- soundcheck R2.0 batts in all 4 walls

- soundcheck gyprock for all walls and ceilings

- squareset corners (no cornice)

- 2 x 720 solicore rebated doors

- step down floor to enable doors to seal at bottom.

 

Approximate cost for all soundcheck materials (including installation) was just under $2,000.

Hope that helps.

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On 8/10/2017 at 11:41 AM, jsmith said:

You could cover that wall with acoustic foam;

Acoustic foam won't do anything to stop sound from getting through that wall to bedroom 2. Not even 1db reduction. The only thing stopping the sound from crossing that boundary is mass, and isolation. Change the framed wall to solid clay brick (not fast-wall brick which has mostly air and very little clay in it). Then attach firechek plasterboard to the brick using resilient mounts. You also need to do something with the ceiling as the sound is going to leak across the boundary via the ceiling. That means, 2 layers of soundchek or firecheck plasterboard instead of regular 10mm ceiling plasterboard.

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