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Connection Types for Dummies!

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I have a CRT with Y/Pb/Pr and then HD / VD SYNC so a total of 5 RCA sockets.

Is this a RGBHV input?

Would I use a VGA -> 5 RCA cable to use this input?

When I get a HD STB would I be best to use this input or a standard 3RCA component?

Cheers,

RB

Yes, that is RGBHV and yes you would use a VGA to RGBHV cable. Do not use the component for the STB, use it for your DVD player, assuming you watch more TV than you do DVD's. If it's the other way around, then maybe using component for the STB is appropriate, but VGA will give a better PQ in my opinion, which some DVD players have too.

JSmith :ph34r:

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I hardly watch DVDs. I would be more interested in using the component for the xbox.

I thought current DVD was only SD anyway?? (thought I read that in here somewhere) so would probably use DVD on s-video.

One more question.....

If I am reading correctly, DVI can send a VGA signal (depending on the STB).

Would I be better to go DVI to RBGHV or 15pin (D-sub??) to RBGHV?

Cheers,

RB

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Would I be better to go DVI to RBGHV or 15pin (D-sub??) to RBGHV?

If the DVI out was DVI-D, it would be impossible, as RGBHV and VGA/D-Sub are analogue connections. If the DVI out was either DVI-I or DVI-A, then it would be possible by buying a DVI->VGA adapter, then using the VGA->RGBHV cable, but that would be a waste if the STB already has a VGA out.

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If the DVI out was DVI-D, it would be impossible, as RGBHV and VGA/D-Sub are analogue connections. If the DVI out was either DVI-I or DVI-A, then it would be possible by buying a DVI->VGA adapter, then using the VGA->RGBHV cable, but that would be a waste if the STB already has a VGA out.

So there is no DVI RGBHV cables out there?

Incidentally, what is DVI-I?

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Well, there are DVI-I to RGBHV cables, as per the following link:

http://www2.dvigear.com/noname4.html

But the STB would have to be DVI-I as well.

DVI-I contains the pinouts for both Analog and Digital DVI, and will automatically detect the display type and send the appropriate signal (there may also be a switch located on the cable to switch between the two). The "I" typically stands for "Integrated", as it integrates both Analog and Digital onto the same cable.

The following shows the different DVI types and their pinouts:

http://www.datapro.net/images/dvi-config.jpg

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I'm thinking of getting component cables for my SD (and soon to be HD) reciever as I'm tired of dull (Like off grey) pictures even with the colour up near full. Since there is a JB Hi-Fi near me, I'll get them from there. But before I do, I've gotta ask: My telly only has a yellow (Video), white (Left Audio) and red (Right Audio) composite plugins, though there is another on the back, with both in and out plugins. Does this mean I'm stuck on composite or can I upgrade to component? Also, is there a HDMI to Component converter so that if I do have the right plugins, I can get top notch PQ?

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I'm thinking of getting component cables for my SD (and soon to be HD) reciever as I'm tired of dull (Like off grey) pictures even with the colour up near full. Since there is a JB Hi-Fi near me, I'll get them from there. But before I do, I've gotta ask: My telly only has a yellow (Video), white (Left Audio) and red (Right Audio) composite plugins, though there is another on the back, with both in and out plugins. Does this mean I'm stuck on composite or can I upgrade to component? Also, is there a HDMI to Component converter so that if I do have the right plugins, I can get top notch PQ?

1) Given that you only have composite connections available on your TV, this is the best connection you can make. You would have to upgrade the TV to make a better connection.

2) There is no such thing as an HDMI to Component converter, however any device that has an HDMI output will almost certainly also have Component out.

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Wow, my humble little thread has broken 10 000 views!

:P:blink:

its such a good reference Peter. :P

I've put a link to it in the HTFAQ sticky as well - so should send a bit of trafic your way, seeing seems to cover most connector related questions people might have.

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its such a good reference Peter. :P

I've put a link to it in the HTFAQ sticky as well - so should send a bit of trafic your way, seeing seems to cover most connector related questions people might have.

Yes, it certainly has saved us all alot of typing in relation to replies... :blink:

JSmith :ph34r:

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Happy birthday Peter

It was just before your last birthday that you gave us this excellent thread which has now had over 11,000 views.

This is a great thread from a great guy, so have a great day!

BTW, I also very much enjoy your contributions on the Jokes thread.

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surfing on the CAV website noticed this that might be of value to people struggling with HDMI issues

http://www.carltonaudiovisual.com.au/?q=node/view/726

HDMI switching and such

Herewith a forward from Denon with some FAQ,s around the issues they are discovering with HDMI connectors.

"As HDMI becomes more popular we should all be aware that some bugs still exist with the HDMI format. Denon USA think it is such a concern that they have a special FAQ section on their website answering some of the problems.

Please read this and discuss with me if needs be but in simple terms not all devices with HDMI can be switched by a receiver (Denon or any other brand). What makes this difficult with the end users is the fact that these devices seem to work when plugged direct to the display device.

In nearly all cases this is an incompatibility of HDCP “handshakes”.

As all Denon receivers with HDMI switching also all include Component to HDMI conversion, if you have a device that will not allow HDMI through the receiver simply use the component outputs of the device into the Denon and allow the Denon to up convert the component signal to HDMI. This process bypasses the HDCP and will almost certainly resolve the problem.

I have copied the text from the webpage on the document attached and below for your information. If you ever have customer issues regarding HDMI please refer to this and see if this resolves the problem. Hopefully in time all HDMI versions will be playing with the same deck of cards and these issues will disappear.

HDMI FAQ

QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS:

1) What Should I know about HDMI connections and cables?

The operation of a product by means of an HDMI connection is guaranteed only when a cable certified by the HDMI standard is used. Product performance can not be guaranteed when a cable not certified by the HDMI standard is used, as signal degradation of the high frequency digital signal can occur. This is often confused as a problem with the device rather than the cable itself. Typical performance failures from uncertified cables can include no picture, blinking (on/off) display, pixilation, sandstorm type of interference and poor quality picture. The HDMI logo is not a certification that the cable has passed the HDMI standard guaranteeing product performance.

CABLES THAT HAVE BEEN CERTIFIED BY THE HDMI STANDARD

At present, the following cables that have confirmed HDMI certification are as follows:

Manufacturer Model Name Types of Cable (length)

JAE DC1 Series 4 types: 1.5, 2, 3, and 5 meters

Radio Shack NA 3 types: 1.8, 3.6 and 4.9 meters

Sony DLC-HM Series 3 types: 1.5, 3, and 5 meters

Audio Technica ATMX Series 3 types: 1.5, 3 and 5 meters

Disclaimer:

This list is not meant to be an all inclusive list of available cables nor is it meant to promote one brand of cable over another. Denon does not endorse any one brand of cable and this is for informational purposes only. This list is subject to change without notice.

Nov/05

2) What is the connection Order for HDMI?

The connection order can be a key issue as to whether or not the HDMI signals will pass through the system. For best results the receiver should be turned on first, then the source device(s) and then the display. The reason for this has to do with getting the equipment to handshake properly for the HDCP protocol. This is a consideration when programming remote control system call keys or hot keys where everything turns on at once. You may need to consider the order of equipment turn on when programming these convenience keys.

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3) Why won't the set top box pass video signal through my receiver with an HDMI connection?

A set top receiver connected to an A/V receiver via HDMI may have trouble passing video signals through the A/V receiver even though a direct connection to the display seems to work fine. This has to do with the HDMI HDCP protocol being sent and received and the authentication process. This is not a fault of the receiver. Recently set top box manufacturers have become aware of this issue. It has been found that the U-code information appears to be the problem which is part of Annex A of the repeater conformity specifications of the HDMI protocol. Some set top receiver manufacturers have already implemented firmware changes to their units while others are in the process of updating their units. If a set top receiver being used is having problems passing HDMI video signal through an A/V receiver, contact the manufacturer of the set top receiver to see if an update is available.

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4) What can I do if the HDMI video will not pass through my receiver?

If HDMI video will not pass through your receiver, you may have an alternate connection method depending on the A/V receiver you have purchased. Check to see if your A/V receiver has analog to digital video conversion. If so, a component connection can be made to the A/V receiver instead for the source in question. Then by turning the analog to digital video conversion feature on in the A/V receiver, video from this source should then be available on the HDMI monitor output connector."

http://usa.denon.com/2082.asp

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Hi guys,

Great info, nice work, particularly to Peter :blink: .

While my STB can send output signals to the component, RGB, sVideo and composite video terminals, the DVD recorder is only equipped with sVideo, SCART and composite video (input) terminals. In order to record from the STB (in widescreen mode), I connect the sVideo out from the STB to the sVideo in of the DVD recorder. But in doing so, I cannot view the HD signal from the STB while I'm recording from the STB, as the HD STB I have at the moment (a cheap one from JB) only sends the video signal to one set of terminals at a time. Is it possible to have a converter or adaptor that connects the component output plus stereo audio from the STB to the SCART input of the DVD recorder? I tried a RGB (3 RCA) to SCART adaptor (from Dick Smith), it does not work, the TV screen is rolling, probably due to the lacking of synchronisation signal. Any suggestion of connecting the STB and DVD recorder to enable recording and viewing at the highest possible PQ setting (from the STB) at the same time?

Cheers

Deadfish

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Hi guys,

Great info, nice work, particularly to Peter :blink: .

While my STB can send output signals to the component, RGB, sVideo and composite video terminals, the DVD recorder is only equipped with sVideo, SCART and composite video (input) terminals. In order to record from the STB (in widescreen mode), I connect the sVideo out from the STB to the sVideo in of the DVD recorder. But in doing so, I cannot view the HD signal from the STB while I'm recording from the STB, as the HD STB I have at the moment (a cheap one from JB) only sends the video signal to one set of terminals at a time. Is it possible to have a converter or adaptor that connects the component output plus stereo audio from the STB to the SCART input of the DVD recorder? I tried a RGB (3 RCA) to SCART adaptor (from Dick Smith), it does not work, the TV screen is rolling, probably due to the lacking of synchronisation signal. Any suggestion of connecting the STB and DVD recorder to enable recording and viewing at the highest possible PQ setting (from the STB) at the same time?

Cheers

Deadfish

I am not that familiar with DVD recorders but I will try to answer your questions as best I can.

SCART is a connection type which can carry a range of signal types.

Your DVD recorder will be able to accept only some types of signal via it's input SCART. I suspect these will be composite and S-Video only. You will need to check your owner's manual to find out.

If this is the case and your DVD recorder has pass-thru, then this is the highest quality signal you will be able to simultaneously view and record.

At best your DVD recorder will be able to record SD (probably a lower standard though) and S-Video is sufficient for this.

There are no DVD recorders I am aware of that save true SD (576i) let alone HD signals and for HD you will have to wait for Blu-ray and HD-DVD recorders due to the file size......

The way that I see it you have a few options;

1) buy a second SD STB to use with the DVD recorder (you can then watch one channel in HD while recording another or that same channel)

2) buy a PVR so that you can record a higher quality signal, true SD (576i) or HD (up to 1080i) but this is not as useful if you want to save programs in the longer term, fine if you tend to only watch recorded programs once or twice. Note that HD PVRs are still very expensive.....

3) buy a STB that can output more than one signal type at once. My Teac HD STB (BV-B800) can do this as can many others, then feed the S-Video to your recorder and say Component to the screen.

Unfortunately, without investing in some new equipment, I suspect that the best signal type you will be able to use simultaneously is likely to be S-Video. :P

Hope this helps,

Peter :P

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SCART is a connection type which can carry a range of signal types.

Your DVD recorder will be able to accept only some types of signal via it's input SCART. I suspect these will be composite and S-Video only. You will need to check your owner's manual to find out.

Can I feed component signals into a Scart jack? The manual does not mention anything about this.

At best your DVD recorder will be able to record SD (probably a lower standard though) and S-Video is sufficient for this.

There are no DVD recorders I am aware of that save true SD (576i) let alone HD signals and for HD you will have to wait for Blu-ray and HD-DVD recorders due to the file size......

Please excuse my igonorance, why can't a reorder record HD signals onto the HD? It may take up more hard disk space, then so be it....I really do not understand that.

The way that I see it you have a few options;

1) buy a second SD STB to use with the DVD recorder (you can then watch one channel in HD while recording another or that same channel)

2) buy a PVR so that you can record a higher quality signal, true SD (576i) or HD (up to 1080i) but this is not as useful if you want to save programs in the longer term, fine if you tend to only watch recorded programs once or twice. Note that HD PVRs are still very expensive.....

3) buy a STB that can output more than one signal type at once. My Teac HD STB (BV-B800) can do this as can many others, then feed the S-Video to your recorder and say Component to the screen.

Unfortunately, without investing in some new equipment, I suspect that the best signal type you will be able to use simultaneously is likely to be S-Video. :blink:

Hope this helps,

Peter :P

This is really helpful. :P

Can I buy just the Scart adaptor and solder the required leads to feed all the three component signals and the audio (stereo) signals into the DVD recorder via the Scart input jack?

Cheers

Deadfish

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1. Can I feed component signals into a Scart jack? The manual does not mention anything about this.

2. Please excuse my igonorance, why can't a reorder record HD signals onto the HD? It may take up more hard disk space, then so be it....I really do not understand that.

This is really helpful. :P

3. Can I buy just the Scart adaptor and solder the required leads to feed all the three component signals and the audio (stereo) signals into the DVD recorder via the Scart input jack?

Cheers

Deadfish

Oops didn't realise that your DVD recorder had a HDD...... :blink:

Answer to all three,

Depends on the capabilities of your DVD recorder!

1. passthru..... maybe, recording to HDD..... depends on the recorder chipset, recording to DVD..... almost certainly not.

2. depends on the chipset in the recorder but unlikely. Topfield PVRs can record HD signals but can't play them.

3. depends on whether your DVD recorder's input SCART is enabled for Component, many are only enabled for composite and S-Video (copy protection issues).

As far as I understand, the only way to record and then play a HD signal is on a HD PVR or HTPC.

NB: HD = High Definition, HDD = Hard Disk Drive

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How to connect a 2nd STB to the following setup?

I'll try to explain what I already have and what I need help with 'trying' to accomplish!

for display:

- HD Plasma Screen

- Strong STB with PVR

- Sony VCR

- ... new addition - a cheapo 2nd STB

This is the current connection...

Antenna Wall Outlet - STB

STB - VCR

VCR - screen

where would the 2nd STB fit in?

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How to connect a 2nd STB to the following setup?

I'll try to explain what I already have and what I need help with 'trying' to accomplish!

for display:

- HD Plasma Screen

- Strong STB with PVR

- Sony VCR

- ... new addition - a cheapo 2nd STB

This is the current connection...

Antenna Wall Outlet - STB

STB - VCR

VCR - screen

where would the 2nd STB fit in?

The option that will give you the best result is to purchase a 4-way signal boster/ splitter.

Kingaray is one of the most popular brands. (no idea what these cost these days)

Then you connect it up as follows;

Wall socket -> signal boster /splitter -> ouput to each of the 4 components.

The reason for getting a boster / splitter is that the more components you have trying to use a single feed, the more that signal is degraded. With your screen being the last in the chain it ends up with a poor signal and Digital FTA TV suffers badly from poor signal stregnth.

If you are unwilling to purchase a splitter / boster then the 2nd STB should go between the PVR and VCR.

Cheers,

Peter

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