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    • Scorchie™

      Upgrade   07/22/2016

      Welcome to Version 4.  You will need to log back in with your Display Name and/or Email Address.  If you don't know this, please issue a password or account reset to obtain the details you need. Some posts will appear "broken" (links, quote text, et al).  The forum is rebuilding all content which will take some time to complete.  Once this is done, the "missing" posts should also hopefully reappear. Should you encounter problems and wish to discuss, please post here:  

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  • Topics

  • Posts

    • Faulty box that never crossed my mind as a possibility - Thanks for letting us know & hopefully that will resolve the issue!!
    • Although I try & keep away from antennas on mobile homes & the like, occasionally I have been involved with the Winegard variety. In my experience, they work because digital television can be quite forgiving, providing the level & quality of the signals are above certain parameters. I've also found the performance of TVs varies, & this can have an effect on viewer satisfaction. I probably get one call a month from a traveller who has just lobbed in to town, & find they can't get reception. It's usually one of 3 things, their receiving system has a fault, their location is not conducive to getting adequate signal, or they're parked very close to a mobile phone tower using band 28 frequencies, the frequencies that used to be part of the UHF TV band. The amplifiers in these antennas, (which have no inbuilt protection for these frequencies) can be overloaded by these signals, as the transmitters for the mobile phone service are sometimes more powerful than the local TV transmitter, & when you are parked within a few hundred metres from them, the tower may wipe out local TV reception. You're entitled to ask the supplier of your caravan what reception experience you can expect from the supplied antenna, & on what basis this is made. You may have recourse against them under consumer guarantees (should you wish to pursue it) if these claims are not met. Otherwise, enjoy it when it works, and engage in something else when it doesn't.
    • Hey Sands I see you have Seaton Sub. Is the folded horn more for music. Been looking at a few horn type designs. Also keen on building a couple of Full Marty subs, Starting off my first sub build with the FI car audio 15in driver I got from Deep Hz for $200. Also waiting on a Bash amp. Just going to copy the original XV15 but with a nicer enclosure and a Blackwood & Satin Box checkerboard design on top.
    • Firstly, the USA does not use vertically polarised signals.  Wineguard is a USA company. We use it because you can put transmitters physically closer together when the same transmission channels are in use. Vertical polarisation is used in the Mandurah area, Great Southern and some other areas in WA. It is in widespread use in other states as well.  There are 1086 vertically polarised transmitters in Australia. Fortunately now, all the transmissions from one site are all the same polarisation. On a conventional antenna there is a boom which is the thickest (often the longest) metal rod. It is pointed at the transmitter. http://www.matchmaster.com.au/digital-tv-antennas/01mm-de13/ download the instructions. There is two pairs of holes in the boom. A U bolt clamps the boom to the mast. The U bolt is inserted parallel to the dipole for horizontal signals and the other pair of holes for vertical. Forget about vertically polarised VHF and horizontally polarised UHF. There are no sites using both polarisations on the same site. On to the boom is mounted at right angles to it is a dipole which is connected to the cable. Shorter than the dipole is a director which acts like a lens focussing the signal on the dipole. Usually there is a reflector which is slightly longer than the dipole and is on the side away from the transmitter and is used to catch any signals which went past the dipole.  I recommended an antenna designed for caravans. All new antennas are narrower than the antennas designed for analog TV particularly channels 0 - 5A. The maximum width is around 750 mm. The boom length increases as the sensitivity increases. The wings on the Satking are connected to an amplifier in the middle, so the wings are a dipole only. It does not have a boom, because there is only the dipole. A dipole has a figure of 8 directionality. ie at right angles to the dipole there is maximum sensitivity and minimum along the axis of the dipole. So the user rotates the antenna for maximum signal but could rotate it by 180 degrees and get an equal signal strength. The reflector prevents signals from behind the antenna from producing picture/sound break up. Directors are on the transmitter side of the dipole and prevent signals from the side. If you rotate the Satking so that the wings are vertical for vertical polarisation, you would need a right angle mounting which keeps the antenna away from the mast. There are omnidirectional antennas which use a circular dipole. These are the least sensitive antenna, but are the only type which can be used on a boat, because the antenna is continually turning. Better some signal than none at all. Why do you think that most houses do not have caravan type antennas whether they are the wing or omnidirectional type? Lack of sensitivity and picks up reflected signals which causes the pictures and sound to break up. Remember that there are lots of very low power repeaters which just cover the villages in remote areas. Mounting antennas you should from http://www.matchmaster.com.au  their complete catalog so that you can find caravan mast bracket clamp 11MM-MC and mast 11MM-MM12 and a stand off bracket for vertical polarisation 11MM-SM1-15. You need the standoff, otherwise the mast is part of the antenna. The other option is to go to VAST Satellite which will give you in ABC, SBS, GWN7, WIN, 9 in WA and the other states ABC,SBS, Southern Cross, Imparja and TEN. There is also most ABC/SBS radio stations as well. For the commercial you will have to get authorisation which is free, but for travellers http://www.mysattv.com.au/ You have to buy a dish, a VAST satellite receiver and signal strength meter so you can point the dish at the satellite every time you move the van. Alanh