MLXXX

NBN download speeds in practice: fast enough to access UHD?

218 posts in this topic

1 hour ago, bassett said:

 [ 1000mbps ]  at a cost of $28.00 SPD per month

Yep... poor isn't it? Well done LNP...

JSmith :ninja:

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5 minutes ago, jsmith said:

Yep... poor isn't it? Well done LNP...

JSmith :ninja:

Cause its fibre. They have the interesting problem that their ISPs keep offering ever more absurd speeds to try differentiate themselves, when in practice the end user would hardly notice the speed bump.

Regards

Peter Gillespie

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1 minute ago, pgdownload said:

Cause its fibre.

Yep, just wish things were done the right way here. It was already well known before Australia even began that FTTN was useless...

JSmith :ninja:

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2 hours ago, bassett said:

Just look at some of the speeds and cost offered by other countries, "example"  Singapore  offers one terabyte upload and download  [ 1000mbps ]  at a cost of $28.00 SPD per month

I couldn't find a 1Gbps plan in Singapore that cheap. Here's the search engine I used: http://www.enjoycompare.com/compare-broadband/?filter-broadband-brand=&filter-speed-from=1Gbps&filter-monthly-cost=&filter-tv-package=&filter-contract-duration=&send=Filter+Results 

 

Singapore has an extremely high population density, with almost everyone living in apartments. Their underground train system is amazing! It's a  very efficiently run island that has embraced technology. 

Singapore has an estimated  population of 5.7 million and a total area of 719.1 km². I note that  Sydney has an area of 12,368 km² and Australia has an area of 7,692 million km².  Google tells me that the population density of Singapore is  7,987.52 people per km². For Australia the figure is only 2.91 people per km². See https://www.indexmundi.com/g/r.aspx?v=21000   Mind you certain parts of Australia have a very high population density, such as Green Square, a fast growing inner suburb of Sydney.

It will no doubt be the most densely populated parts of Australia that get the fasted home internet the soonest.

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2 hours ago, pgdownload said:

Fixed Wireless is an very small part of the NBN offerings,in that gap between satellite and where the population density is very low and spread out. I suspect most fixed wireless users are very happy with the speed boost but its a technology that can have major issues in some instances. I believe the NBNCo has been sending 'pro teams' back to various installations as its obviously something that needs to be set up right at the home.

Peter Gillespie

I think your commenting on something you have no knowledge off and are simply following the miss guided propaganda, being pushed by NBNco and the Government, About how everything is wonderful
 
 
 I read this article  which seems a fair one
 
But for some connected to the NBN company’s Fixed Wireless infrastructure, the performance of the platform is leading them to question whether their old ADSL broadband was actually a better option.
 
One simply does not need to comment further on your link,  Does one.
 
As for fixed wireless being a very small part of the NBNco infrastructure. This may well be true in the larger cities, or on the planet you live on. In reality it's totally the different.  Large country towns or Cities [cough.cough]  would have less then 20%  Fibre optic cabling.  Places like Coffs Harbour, have a very small amount of Fibre Optic installed . Even the cities public library has to rely on Fixed Wireless, as does some of the high schools. There is very little Fibre Optic on the Eastern seaboard, with inland towns faring much the same or worse. NBNco simply slap up a tower, and congratulate themselves on the fact it's there. The fact it's total inadequate for the number of connections intending to be used, just doesn't register with NBNco. The result is a complete lack of bandwidth, Failing speeds [not that there's much in the way of speed anyway ]
 
Quote from your good self,
But then the fixed wireless network has just got a major speed boost (100/40) which has got to be encouraging. 
 
The costs now are way over the top, for what your getting,  But  NBNco will of cause blame the IP for the Increased
Pricing Structure as they do with everything else that's wrong with there system Pass the buck, would seem to be there war cry with everything there third world attempt at an Internet service provides.  There was a report a while ago about this so called increase in speed, a 100mbps service did not provide anything faster then 35mbps supply.
You will probable find they take there test results when NO ONE is using the service, As they did  / do  when there fixed wireless is first installed. We had someone round when our local tower 25kilometers away was first switched one, The guy throw a bloody fit, when we stood in front of his  transponder, and dared to inquire, what the f**k
 A great success indeed..
Our little village shop  has both ADSL2  [our exchange is across the road from the shop ] for the CenterLink computer
And fixed wireless for general use. Try tell him the fixed wireless is better.

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5 minutes ago, bassett said:
I think your commenting on something you have no knowledge off and are simply following the miss guided propaganda, being pushed by NBNco and the Government, About how everything is wonderful
 
 
 I read this article  which seems a fair one
 
But for some connected to the NBN company’s Fixed Wireless infrastructure, the performance of the platform is leading them to question whether their old ADSL broadband was actually a better option.
 
One simply does not need to comment further on your link,  Does one.
 
As for fixed wireless being a very small part of the NBNco infrastructure. This may well be true in the larger cities, or on the planet you live on. In reality it's totally the different.  Large country towns or Cities [cough.cough]  would have less then 20%  Fibre optic cabling.  Places like Coffs Harbour, have a very small amount of Fibre Optic installed . Even the cities public library has to rely on Fixed Wireless, as does some of the high schools. There is very little Fibre Optic on the Eastern seaboard, with inland towns faring much the same or worse. NBNco simply slap up a tower, and congratulate themselves on the fact it's there. The fact it's total inadequate for the number of connections intending to be used, just doesn't register with NBNco. The result is a complete lack of bandwidth, Failing speeds [not that there's much in the way of speed anyway ]
 
Quote from your good self,
But then the fixed wireless network has just got a major speed boost (100/40) which has got to be encouraging. 
 
The costs now are way over the top, for what your getting,  But  NBNco will of cause blame the IP for the Increased
Pricing Structure as they do with everything else that's wrong with there system Pass the buck, would seem to be there war cry with everything there third world attempt at an Internet service provides.  There was a report a while ago about this so called increase in speed, a 100mbps service did not provide anything faster then 35mbps supply.
You will probable find they take there test results when NO ONE is using the service, As they did  / do  when there fixed wireless is first installed. We had someone round when our local tower 25kilometers away was first switched one, The guy throw a bloody fit, when we stood in front of his  transponder, and dared to inquire, what the f**k
 A great success indeed..
Our little village shop  has both ADSL2  [our exchange is across the road from the shop ] for the CenterLink computer
And fixed wireless for general use. Try tell him the fixed wireless is better.

 

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52 minutes ago, MLXXX said:

 

 

Singapore has an extremely high population density, with almost everyone living in apartments.

That's the same old chestnut used by the Government, Increased population, more condensed living, bullshit, bullshit.

 

The facts are we started with a completely clean slate, when it came to high speed internet services, and it's been a total cock-up from day one. But as the government always finds it's everyone's fault but there's.

AS for speed,  now research South Korea  and Japan

Edited by bassett

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1 hour ago, bassett said:

AS for speed

For sure... I may have posted this previously, but just in case;

http://www.sciencealert.com/how-a-new-type-of-laser-has-become-a-data-transfer-speed-record-breaker

"A team of engineers has just used a new type of laser-based transmission technology to smash data transfer records, achieving an incredibly speedy 57 gigabits per second at room temperature."

Maybe then we can stream uncompressed UHD? :D

JSmith :ninja:

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5 hours ago, bassett said:

I think your commenting on something you have no knowledge off and are simply following the miss guided propaganda, being pushed by NBNco and the Government, About how everything is wonderful

OK I'll bite (bassett get it?). If there's one thing I've learnt about the internet its that angry, self extrapolating, selective, self aggrandising post railing against the incompetence of everyone else isn't a good place to start a conversation.

Presented with a pretty balanced article you managed to pull out a single self serving quote and felt that all comments should end on that point. I think that approach really doesn't need (or encourage) any further comment on.

Quote

 The facts are we started with a completely clean slate

Starting a sentence with "the facts are" is the literary equivalent of "To be honest with you...". We didn't start with anything like a "clean slate" (is 100 years of industrial, geographical, political, technological and ideological baggage a clean slate?) For one thing Telstra sort to block any sort of NBN unless it was on its own terms. Labour's FTTP approach wasn't based on science or economics, but basically the only way to bypass Telstra's strangle hold on the last copper mile. It worked and subsequently Telstra moved to be part of the solution and not the problem. 

Ultimately getting good broadband to the entire country was always going to be problematic. Huge technical and economic barriers. Our "clean slate" meant it also became a political football of almost nonsensical proportions. I don't subscribe to 'everything is wonderful' world view but I also don't subscribe to the 'everything is awful' one either. 

Regards

Peter Gillespie

Edited by pgdownload

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5 hours ago, bassett said:

That's the same old chestnut used by the Government, Increased population, more condensed living, bullshit, bullshit.

No, it's reality.  If I was quoting to supply a national internet grid to the island of Singapore I'd quote much much less than I would quote to provision the capital cities, regional centres, country towns, and isolated homesteads, of Australia.

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If there's one thing I've learnt about the Internet its that angry, self extrapolating, selective, self aggrandising post railing against the incompetence of everyone else isn't a good place to start a conversation.
 
No one's getting angry, Sunshine. I'm just  telling it the way everyone else see's it and reports it. Your carrying on like it's a personal attack on your good self.  But if the Cap fit's.
 
I'm very sorry I don't live in your concrete jungle, But unlike you I have a  life, The rush hours a couple of cars and a school bus.  Happy Cows are  munching away, and Spuds are  growing in profusion..  Unfortunately my diction is  not up to your high standard, but we all have our crosses to bear. 
 
Starting a sentence with "the facts are" is the literary equivalent of "To be honest with you..."
 
Here we go again,  Your  Insulting people simple because what they report is not up to your standard, or something you don't agree with. Something about people living in ivory towers comes to mind.  Ho-Hum.  I doubt anyone's really impressed
Your comments on Telstra are probably correct,  Well nearly. From Dial-up days, Big Puddle  have always been overpriced compared to other providers
 
Are you aware that if your unfortunate enough to have a fixed wireless service. All copper phone lines will be retained. As you all knowing I'll allow you to look up the reason for this.
 
Ultimately getting good broadband to the entire country was always going to be problematic.
 
Here we go again, Didn't anyone tell them the country's  large.  There supposedly experts , who are on very large salaries, there paid to handle these problems.   It's Pink Bats all over again. "Wasn't us. Blame everyone else.
 
And then we get the biggest lie of all.   Welcome to the NBN's High Speed Broadband
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Edited by bassett

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Yes I probably did take your post unnecessarily personal. I was annoyed at something else and it fed in to my general irritation of overarching generalizations and assumptions to support their individual circumstance. Like
 
I'm just telling it the way everyone else see's it and reports it, or
I don't live in your concrete jungle, or
unlike you I have a  life ??
 
Your Insulting people simple because what they report is not up to your standard
Quite the opposite. You made a statement of "fact" (my point was it was really one of opinion. Prefacing it with "The facts are" only highlights that. Same way you know when someone starts a sentence with "Honestly" they're not telling you the whole story.
 
But we're in agreement that the NBN is a bit of a dog's breakfast. But its coming together, slowly. 20,000+ homes connected each week across this land is an astonishing achievement IMO. The 'experts' knew it was a big task, an impossible task. Everyone knew that. The problems were always going to occur. You're obviously caught up in one at the moment. Here's hoping it gets resolved. At least there's actually a whole bunch of people actively focused on trying to fix the problems unlike before when you could only get in touch with the Telstra call staff.
 
Regards
 
Peter Gillespie

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1 hour ago, pgdownload said:
Yes I probably did take your post unnecessarily personal.
Peter Gillespie

Don't worry about it, we all have bad day's. My shoulders are broad, and I've been round the block too many times to let it worry me.

 You made a statement of "fact" 

Simply because it was fact. I don't sugar coat things, and while I freely admit I have no experience and have never encountered or used a Fibre Optic connection, I do have a lot  of contact with people who are experiencing Fixed Wireless,  and all the problems that come with it.  Mainly people who have subscribed to streaming services such as Netflex, and are unable to get a  watchable result due to complete lack of bandwidth.  

I'm informed that they will be upgrading the wireless service  with 100mbps  becoming available, No doubt the costs will be over the top for what people are really going to get in relation to actual speeds, People who now pay for 25mbps are getting something like 8mbps, and 50mbps   something like 30 to 35 at peak times, with the wind behind it. With the bad weather we have been experiencing  over the last few weeks, complete drop-outs are the order of the day.  What they should  be doing is supplying a lot more transmitters, to alleviate there overloaded systems, we have at present.  

There so-called satellite service will fail, Doubtless is will kill of the  current  working satellite service.  But that's another debate entirly

Edited by bassett

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1 hour ago, pgdownload said:
 But its coming together, slowly. 20,000+ homes connected each week across this land is an astonishing achievement IMO
 
Regards
 
Peter Gillespie

That can be summed up in one word  ''PROPAGANDA"    It all sounds wonderful on paper, unfortunately in practice it's another story entirely

Lets brake it down, quite simply  20,000 by 52 = 1040000 connections  in a year.  Have you seen just how fast NBNco workers work. As I said Propaganda

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I see that Stan recommend 15Mbps for their UHD streaming.

From https://help.stan.com.au/hc/en-us/articles/202845004-What-kind-of-Internet-speed-do-I-need-to-run-Stan-

What kind of Internet speed do I need to run Stan?

To get Stan up and running you need a minimum of 0.6 mbps. If you want to get the best out of Stan, we recommend the following speeds:

  • 2.0 mbps for good picture quality
  • 3.0 mbps for Standard Definition (SD)
  • 4.5 mbps for High Definition 720p (HD 720p)
  • 7.5 mbps for High Definition 1080p (HD 1080p)
  • 15.0 mbps for Ultra High Definition 4K (UHD 4K)

To check your Internet connection speed to our content delivery network, please click here: http://t1.re



A bit earlier tonight our speed for our non-NBN connection (Optus cable) using the above link was reported to be 18Mbps. In contrast to that, an Ookla speed test reported a download speed of 24Mbps. 

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14 hours ago, MLXXX said:

A bit earlier tonight our speed for our non-NBN connection (Optus cable) using the above link was reported to be 18Mbps. In contrast to that, an Ookla speed test reported a download speed of 24Mbps. 

Those speed tests sites can vary a bit - a relatives FTTP NBN was '30mbps' with the Google speedtest, but then changing to Ookla (web url) it returned their more typical 90mbps result.

The server used to grab the test data is usually to blame. Sometimes the server auto-detection built into the speed test App/webpage gets it wrong & selects one further away, but sometimes it's an unknown as to why it's slower/faster than other speed tests....

....just looked up Google's speed test page & found some typical reasons behind variation...

Why your test results may vary

Your test results can change in a short period of time, and they might be different from other Internet speed test results. Results can vary for many reasons, such as:

  • Changes in network conditions
  • Differences in where testing servers are located
  • Differences in testing methods

https://support.google.com/websearch/answer/6283840?p=speedtest&visit_id=1-636284156873279713-1770425582&rd=1

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6 hours ago, Ralfi said:

Those speed tests sites can vary a bit

Yes of course but I think the main factor here was that the Stan test was for a lengthy internet path to test the ability to download from Stan, whereas the Ookla speed test was merely for access to my nearest Optus server .

Again, here is the link that Stan provide for testing:  

Quote

To check your Internet connection speed to our content delivery network, please click here: http://t1.re 

I see that the domain suffix "re" is generally used for Réunion (a French island located in the Indian Ocean, east of Madagascar).   However despite that the url resolves to an ip address in Amsterdam according to several databases, or Chicago according to another database!  Or at least that is what is currently reported using https://www.iplocation.net/ 

That doesn't seem right though. I'd have thought we'd be able to access Stan (an Australian streaming service) from servers closer than the Netherlands, or the USA.

Edited by MLXXX

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9 hours ago, MLXXX said:

That doesn't seem right though. I'd have thought we'd be able to access Stan (an Australian streaming service) from servers closer than the Netherlands, or the USA.

I can't speak for Stan, but Optus made a big song and dance (legitimately) about being the only ISP that cached Netflix shows locally. All the other ISPs had to get TV via the US servers. Given the innumerable drawbacks for streamers hosting content from overseas I'm sure everyone is working to get content saved locally.

As for speed tests on Stan etc. They may be a link to the Stand servers but they are just as likely to be generic speed test links that want to ensure you've got the minimum 3 Mbps speeds required.

Regards

Peter Gillespie

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