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Hd Or Full Hd Video Camera?


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#1 Ps3Tony

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Posted 11 February 2012 - 12:44 PM

Will paying $200 extra for FULL HD Video Camera be worth it over a HD video camera?

I want to create personal business presenations for youtube and my website and DVD.

Would a HD video camera suffice?

With FULL HD, you need to burn it onto a blueray DVD to get FULL HD capability, or how else can others watch it?

Was looking at the JVC: http://www.digitalca...au/prod7556.htm

But for $200 less I can get a JVC HD video camera instead.

What you all think?

Appreciate any comments/feedback.

Cheers.

Edited by Ps3Tony, 11 February 2012 - 12:45 PM.


#2 :)

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Posted 11 February 2012 - 01:46 PM

just a tip for PQ its the size of the sensor that can make a huge difference. grab a digital SLR, even a low end one and the quality of picture you get will be cut above handycams. the $900 or so the jvc costs will get you a nice digital SLR and lens.

http://www.digitalca...tegory521_1.htm

a 550D with a 18-135IS lens for instance would walk all over any comparitive handycam for the same money.

I say so having both a pana fullhd handycam and also a canon digital slr.

ps dont waste your time trying to put on blu-ray. its costly and not everyone for business purposes have blu-ray players.

#3 Ps3Tony

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Posted 11 February 2012 - 03:21 PM

just a tip for PQ its the size of the sensor that can make a huge difference. grab a digital SLR, even a low end one and the quality of picture you get will be cut above handycams. the $900 or so the jvc costs will get you a nice digital SLR and lens.

http://www.digitalca...tegory521_1.htm

a 550D with a 18-135IS lens for instance would walk all over any comparitive handycam for the same money.

I say so having both a pana fullhd handycam and also a canon digital slr.

ps dont waste your time trying to put on blu-ray. its costly and not everyone for business purposes have blu-ray players.


I am sorry but I do not understand what you said.

What is PQ and what does it mean?

And what is a sensor and what does "size of the sensor" mean?

And everything on that link you gave is extremely expensive, a lot more than the JVC FULL HD video camera I was looking at.
Cheers.

Edited by Ps3Tony, 11 February 2012 - 03:22 PM.


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Posted 11 February 2012 - 05:11 PM

I am sorry but I do not understand what you said.

What is PQ and what does it mean?

And what is a sensor and what does "size of the sensor" mean?

And everything on that link you gave is extremely expensive, a lot more than the JVC FULL HD video camera I was looking at.
Cheers.


apologies, the abbreviation PQ used for Picture Quality. Which I presumed would be an important factor given these videos your filming for business purposes. ie its not just for some home videos.

with picture quality in mind the sensor a camera uses to capture the movies is very important. particluarly the size as the smaller they get the less sensitive they tend to be to light and have lower ability to capture the detail and full vibrancy and richness of colours vs say a camera with a much larger sensor. If you look at the jvc range for instance the top line cameras have around 1/2" sensors the cheaper ones have 1/4" and some smaller again. the larger sensor cameras will give you much better indoor and low light capability which is important unless purely outdoors in daylight or if using studio lighting. The larger sensor cameras will also give you the most vibrant looking pictures.

if picture quality is non essential. and if shooting outdoors in daylight etc, you can get very decent results with even an iphone which will film "fullHD" movies.

I have an iphone, a panasonic sd9 fullhd handy cam, and a canon 7D DSLR and the order I have listed is how they would rank in picture quality under a wide range of conditions.

in regards price you havent told us anything really as to how much want to spend, only thing you have linked to is the jvc gz-hm870 which is a $929 handycam which I dont believe is sold anymore.

http://www.jvc.com.a...ameras/gz-hm870

my suggestion was to also consider digital SLRs as they have quite large sensors and also can use with them what are quite decent sensors for even the base models. in the link I provided

http://www.digitalca...tegory521_1.htm

you can pick up a base model slr and kit lens for half the cost of the jvc. or if willing to spend equivalent money the 550d and 18-135IS which would not only make a very good video camera but as a bonus is a very nice still camera as well.

#5 SDL

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Posted 12 February 2012 - 10:00 AM

Went through the same thing about a year ago, determined to get a HD Vidoe Cam, but after much investigation got a Canon 600D as the video mode is every bit as good, if not better than most handicams, and the addition of a good SLR. The only downside is it isn't as easy to hold as a handicam, but I didn't see that as a major thing.

#6 mtv

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Posted 12 February 2012 - 10:58 AM

Digital SLR's have horrible audio by comparison to video cameras and can have exposure issues when zooming etc.

They are also hard to control zooming etc, compared to a video camera.

For youtube, you don't even need HD and DVD isn't HD either.

There would be absolutely no advantage of Full HD (1080p) for either use, so if your main requirement is video... the HD video camera would be my choice.

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Posted 12 February 2012 - 11:11 AM

Digital SLR's have horrible audio by comparison to video cameras and can have exposure issues when zooming etc.

They are also hard to control zooming etc, compared to a video camera.

For youtube, you don't even need HD and DVD isn't HD either.

There would be absolutely no advantage of Full HD (1080p) for either use, so if your main requirement is video... the HD video camera would be my choice.


not been my experience mtv so far used the canon 7D and father in laws 550D and a friend came over over christmas with a nikon d90 and that did a superb job for audio and video both outdoors and indoors. keen to know which slrs you find this with as I do not think this is charecteristic of them I would say. perhaps some early dlsrs that were trying to do video as well. but dont think it is the case any more. Not surre your aware but many TV commercials and even film makers use DSLRs for hd video these days and this is for broadcast quality audio and video.

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Posted 12 February 2012 - 11:16 AM

Went through the same thing about a year ago, determined to get a HD Vidoe Cam, but after much investigation got a Canon 600D as the video mode is every bit as good, if not better than most handicams, and the addition of a good SLR. The only downside is it isn't as easy to hold as a handicam, but I didn't see that as a major thing.


hi sdl, yes in use dslrs are not as easy to hold as a handcam and handycams can be quicker / easier to zoom. to get an handle on that I'd suggest to the OP to head to a shop and try either out to see how they are in use. as you say for video slrs I'd say too just as good and can be better in my experience. with bonus of having a real nice dslr for photos as a bonus :)

#9 Ps3Tony

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Posted 13 February 2012 - 07:09 AM

Bing Lee are selling the jvc gz-hm870 for $349 now. Does it have a good sensor quality?

#10 swordfish805

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Posted 13 February 2012 - 08:10 AM

If youtube is the purpose you are buying the cam, then don't spend megabucks.

#11 Ps3Tony

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Posted 13 February 2012 - 10:06 AM

youtube and DVD videos to hand out to clients. So you think a HD will suffice? No need for a FULL HD?

If I buy a JVC HD it will be around $250+$70 (32GB) for memory card. And if I buy the FULL HD JVC it's around $450.

Will a 16GB memory suffice? How many GB is taken per every 1 hour when you record in HD? And how much for FULL HD?

Edited by Ps3Tony, 13 February 2012 - 10:15 AM.


#12 MarkTecher

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Posted 14 February 2012 - 09:20 AM

I do use the 1080P option on you tube if it something I really want to see in the best quality or if I am connecting the PC to the projector. If I am just sent a link, I usually watch in 360 on my PC monitor. 1080P takes almost twice as long to down load and if it is for promotional material, 720 is going to really good for most.

#13 fawlty99

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Posted 14 February 2012 - 10:07 AM

youtube and DVD videos to hand out to clients. So you think a HD will suffice? No need for a FULL HD?

If I buy a JVC HD it will be around $250+$70 (32GB) for memory card. And if I buy the FULL HD JVC it's around $450.

Will a 16GB memory suffice? How many GB is taken per every 1 hour when you record in HD? And how much for FULL HD?

As already said DVD is still the standard (not blu-ray) so no advantage in full-hd recorder. Capacity is not so easy to answer as it depends on a number of factors. I would think the model you are looking at would have indicative storage requirements listed in the operating manual. 32gb is not much these days for raw video data and remember your DVD (or BD) authoring software will rejig the bitrates etc to fit a DVD or BD capacity disc.

#14 mtv

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Posted 14 February 2012 - 12:16 PM

not been my experience mtv so far used the canon 7D and father in laws 550D and a friend came over over christmas with a nikon d90 and that did a superb job for audio and video both outdoors and indoors. keen to know which slrs you find this with as I do not think this is charecteristic of them I would say. perhaps some early dlsrs that were trying to do video as well. but dont think it is the case any more. Not surre your aware but many TV commercials and even film makers use DSLRs for hd video these days and this is for broadcast quality audio and video.


I've used the Canon 5D and 7D for both commercial broadcast and corporate production, but only where the camera is in a fixed position or tilt/pan.. no other functions.

Audio is recorded separately, as inbuilt mics in those cameras is inadequate and external audio interfacing does not work well.

Audio might be acceptable for domestic 'home video' use but try using it outdoors in the wind, several metres away from a talking head.. it's just not acceptable for professional use.

I'm certainly not disputing the PQ which can be obtained, because it can be excellent, but it comes down to the end use and the budget of the OP, which is lower-end $200-$300 for which you won't be able to buy a good digital SLR and lenses.

The larger the sensor, or in the case of higher-quality video cameras... 3 sensors.. the better the PQ.

Cheaper cameras usually have much smaller sensors than their more expensive counterparts.

Without getting too bogged down with technicalities, the OP needs to decide what PQ will be acceptable to him for his intended final use.

DVD is SD, so it's 576i or 576p.

Youtube can be whatever you want, but 720p is usually more than adequate as HD.

1920 x1080p meets the 'Full HD' criteria, but if you have low quality optics, noisy video processing, smaller-single image sensor etc, you can still have very average PQ, which is why a $50K camera with a $30K lens is going to produce far higher quality images compared to a $300 camera/lens, even though both are defined as 'Full HD'.

The same principle applies to the higher-end digital SLR's... the optics are generally better than the cheaper video cameras and they usually have larger sensors.

Sure.... great stills cameras, but video in them is designed as an 'extra' feature, not it's primary function.

Same as many video cameras can take stills as a secondary feature.

Given the OP appears to have little knowledge and experience in video production, a low budget and predominately SD output requirements, I feel a video camera would be better-suited to his needs.

#15 Ps3Tony

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Posted 14 February 2012 - 09:31 PM

Thanks for your comments:) Appreciated.

#16 Ps3Tony

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Posted 18 February 2012 - 09:10 AM

I ended up buying this one:

http://www.jvc.com.a...ameras/gz-hm870

I got it for $449 from Bing Lee.

#17 Machvayne

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Posted 20 February 2012 - 01:23 PM

I ended up buying this one:

http://www.jvc.com.a...ameras/gz-hm870

I got it for $449 from Bing Lee.


Hey Ps3Tony, I know it's only been a couple of days, but how have you found the JVC so far??

I'm currently looking for a video camera in a similar price range.

#18 Ps3Tony

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Posted 08 April 2012 - 07:51 AM

Hey Ps3Tony, I know it's only been a couple of days, but how have you found the JVC so far??

I'm currently looking for a video camera in a similar price range.


Yes we got the JVC for a great price from Bing Lee:)