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Argentine Tv In 3d Full Hd Over Dtt Breakthrough


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#1 pheggie

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Posted 07 December 2011 - 10:54 PM

http://3dcinecast.bl...d-over-dtt.html

Argentine TV in 3D HD over DTT Breakthrough

A team of scientists and engineers in Argentina have carried out the world's first successful experimental transmission of a 3D Full HD video signal over a digital terrestrial television (DTT) channel.

According to technology website RedUSERS, at 17:31 local time on Friday engineers Francisco Carrá and Oscar Nuncio (technical manager and technical sub-manager of Argentine public broadcaster Channel 7) were able to verify the reception of the 3D signals. These had been broadcast via one of the new antennas being erected in the country, and transmitted through a regular ISDB-T channel.

A video compression catalyser designed and developed by Mario Mastriani, head of the Images and Signals Laboratory at the National University of Tres de Febrero (UNTREF), was at the heart of the system.

The device boosts the video compression level of H.264/MPEG-4 Part 10 (or AVC) codecs by a factor of four. With the help of this component, the team was able to broadcast the 3D signals in 1080p (Full HD) quality, but critically using the same bitrate currently utilised to transmit a 2D HD channel (in 1080i) via DTT. No additional latency to that typically seen in H.264 transmissions was observed during the tests.

The images were captured with a Panasonic 1080p-3D camera, while a NEC encoder was also used. The arriving signal was decoded with an ISDB-T USB device connected to a PC fitted with Nvidia SDI and Nvidia Quadro 6000 input/output video cards. The obtained signal was routed into a 3D HDTV video activity monitor, while the output signal was routed into a standard 3D screen.

According to RedUSERS, the same receiving setting could be easily replicated in a conventional set-top box, whose only additional requirement would be the incorporation of a 3D image processing chip.

Back in January 2011, British firm Motive Television had announced the development of set-top box software able to deal with 3D TV content broadcast via DTT. The Motive technology, branded as 3VOD, was first deployed in Italy by Silvio Berlusconi's broadcaster Mediaset

#2 alanh

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Posted 08 December 2011 - 12:36 AM

What this article does not tell you
1. Was this transmission receivable with a standard ISDB-T MPEG-4 as commonly used in South America.
2. Was the signal frame compatible or non frame compatible
3. ISDB-T uses 6 MHz wide channels and a frame rate of either 29.94 or 30 frame/s. Was this used or was the 3-D signals transmitted at 24 frame/s to reduce the required data bandwidth.
4. ISDB-T is also a OFDM system so did they increase the number of carriers to increase the data capacity of the 6 MHz channel?

For non North and South American and a few other countries such as Japan and South Korea DVB is used. DVB-T2 increases the number of carriers and use a better error correction system of DVB-T that we use and for DVB-T and ATSC.

DVB-T2 is already multiple 1920 x 1080 25i signals in the UK, so it could easily carry 3-D as long as a broadcaster is prepared to give up a program. If non frame compatible 3-D is used a 3 FHD channels can carry 2 3-D channels with the third carrying the pair of depth signals.

AlanH

#3 MLXXX

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Posted 18 December 2011 - 09:34 AM

I have found a relevant paper that was submitted by Marioni Mastiani, head of the Images and Signals Laboratory at the National University of Tres de Febrero (UNTREF), in November 2010. A 3 megabyte pdf of it can be found at http://www.redusers....1/06/paper6.pdf

The paper is quite technical. The abstract reads as follows:

Abstract—Super-resolution is nowadays used for a high-resolution
image produced from several low-resolution noisy frames. In this
work, we consider the problem of high-quality interpolation of a
single noise-free image. Such images may come from different sources,
i.e., they may be frames of videos, individual pictures, etc. On
the other hand, in the encoder we apply a downsampling via bidimensional
interpolation of each frame, and in the decoder we apply a
upsampling by which we restore the original size of the image. If the
compression ratio is very high, then we use a convolutive mask that
restores the edges, eliminating the blur. Finally, both, the encoder
and the complete decoder are implemented on General-Purpose
computation on Graphics Processing Units (GPGPU) cards. In fact,
the mentioned mask is coded inside texture memory of a GPGPU.


The pdf includes images showing improvements in visible resolution possible using this type of image processing.

Based on the article pheggie linked to, and the techniques described in the paper, I'd suggest that for the test broadcast in Argentina the Full HD 3D source was encoded [with a special interpolation technique] as MPEG-4 AVC video, decodable by a standard MPEG-4 AVC set top box as relatively low resolution side by side 3D (e.g. 960x1080 Left + 960x1080 Right). And it seems that with the addition of the special decoder, additional resolution would have been inferred and used to synthesize 1920x1080 Left + 1920x1080 Right.

In other words, the article pheggie linked to means what it says. A standard format TV signal is broadcast, but a specially equipped receiver is able to extract additional resolution. It will be interesting to read independent critical evaluations of how effective this technique really is in practice with video of a feature film, or a sporting event.

"Super-resolution" as a concept has been around for a few years. See http://en.wikipedia....uper-resolution. Some of the improvements in quality of still images are dramatic.

Edited by MLXXX, 18 December 2011 - 01:50 PM.


#4 DrP

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Posted 18 December 2011 - 10:11 AM

For those who are interested ISDB can also operate on other channel bandwidths such as 7MHz and 8MHz, it is not restricted to 6MHz. That countries have implemented it in 6MHz channels does not mean it can not be used in wider allocations, much the same as other digital television system can make use of 6, 7 and 8MHz channel widths.

#5 alanh

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Posted 18 December 2011 - 11:51 AM

So DrP,
Whilst it can be used at other bandwidths than 6 MHz where is it used at wider bandwidths?

AlanH

#6 MLXXX

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Posted 18 December 2011 - 01:40 PM

Alanh,
according to Wikipedia ( http://en.wikipedia....Technical_facts ), the Maldives is the first country to adopt ISDB-T with the 8 MHz channel bandwidth option:

e) Channel Bandwidth: Japan, Brazil, Peru, Argentina, Chile, Venezuela and Ecuador: 6 MHz (It is possible to use SBTVD/ISDB-T system with 13 segments in 7 MHz or 8 MHz if that is required by any country. Maldives is the first country to adopt ISDB-T with 8 MHz channel bandwidth.

The press release is here: http://www.soumu.go....s/111019_c.html

There was a promising test result in Angola in 2010 with an 8 MHz bandwidth. The following is a translation by Google from part of an article in Portuguese:


Conclusions
The end of the first phase of tests concluded that the standard nipo-Brazilian digital TV can be easily implemented in Angola. The conclusion, however, not restricted to the reality of that country. The positive result opens a new market for the ISDB-T, since television channels in Africa, like Europe, occupies 8MHz. In Latin America and Japan, the band of each TV channel is 6MHz.

Moreover, in a statement from the National Institute of Telecommunications (Inatel), Brazil assured to be "willing to promote the transfer of knowledge and technology through the demonstration of the testing ISDB-T," adding that the joint action of the countries will be of great importance in defining the system adopted.

Participated in this first phase of testing, and Inatel and Linear, broadcasters and members of the Angolan government.


The full article can be viewed in English using the link: http://translate.goo...p....asp?id=591

Edited by MLXXX, 18 December 2011 - 01:42 PM.


#7 DrP

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Posted 18 December 2011 - 02:02 PM

I think we might just see the Maldives and Angola suddenly erased from the map, much the same as South Korea was. ;)
To restate: That an aspect of a specification isn't implemented does not mean that it can not be implemented.

reality: 1; alanh: 0

#8 digitalj

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Posted 18 December 2011 - 07:12 PM

I think we might just see the Maldives and Angola suddenly erased from the map, much the same as South Korea was. ;)
To restate: That an aspect of a specification isn't implemented does not mean that it can not be implemented.

reality: 100000000000000000000000; alanh: 0


fixed.