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Atsc Transmitter Channels


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#1 alanh

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Posted 21 July 2011 - 02:18 AM

Band 1 ATSC channel 2 - 6 54 - 88 MHz 32 transmitters between 270 W - 45 kW, average 14.65 kWERP Not used in Australia for DTV
Band 3 ATSC channel 7 - 13 174 - 216 MHz 3159 transmitters from 1 W to 325 kW (equals Aust channels 6 - 10) Our regional-wide transmitters are 50 kW
Band 4 ATSC channel 14 - 32 470 - 584 MHz 671 transmitters (equals Aust channels 20 - 35) Channels 20 - 27 not used for TV
Band 5 ATSC channel 33 - 50 584 - 692 MHz 569 transmitters (ATSC channel 37 is not used in the USA for TV (equals Aust channels 36 - 51)

ATSC channel 51 692 - 698 MHz 28 transmitters Aust channel 52
ATSC channels 52 - 63 698 - 770 MHz 10 transmitters which will have to change channel for the digital dividend. Aust Channels 53 - 62

The highest power in the UHF band is 1 MW and there are quite a few of them, Band 3 325 kW.

There are 4216 NTSC translators whos power ranges from 2 W with a few at 1 kW, there are a very small number UHF exceptions upto 100 kW which are not translators but low power TV stations, usually religious.


AlanH

#2 DrP

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Posted 21 July 2011 - 06:19 AM

Band 1 ATSC channel 2 - 6 54 - 88 MHz 32 transmitters between 270 W - 45 kW, average 14.65 kWERP Not used in Australia for DTV
Band 3 ATSC channel 7 - 13 174 - 216 MHz 3159 transmitters from 1 W to 325 kW (equals Aust channels 6 - 10) Our regional-wide transmitters are 50 kW
Band 4 ATSC channel 14 - 32 470 - 584 MHz 671 transmitters (equals Aust channels 20 - 35) Channels 20 - 27 not used for TV
Band 5 ATSC channel 33 - 50 584 - 692 MHz 569 transmitters (ATSC channel 37 is not used in the USA for TV (equals Aust channels 36 - 51)

ATSC channel 51 692 - 698 MHz 28 transmitters Aust channel 52
ATSC channels 52 - 63 698 - 770 MHz 10 transmitters which will have to change channel for the digital dividend. Aust Channels 53 - 62

The highest power in the UHF band is 1 MW and there are quite a few of them, Band 3 325 kW.

There are 4216 NTSC translators whos power ranges from 2 W with a few at 1 kW, there are a very small number UHF exceptions upto 100 kW which are not translators but low power TV stations, usually religious.


AlanH*


No, no, no. That can't be right. An 'informed' forum member edumacated us all to the fact that there are no 'low VHF ATSC transmissions in the USA'. ^_^

On another point, it appears that the OP is quoting ERP figures, as shown in the first point of the post, and has then gone on to state that 'our regional-wide transmitters are 50kW'. Unfortunately this appears to disagree with the real world where one can easily find examples of Australian DVB-t transmissions within the frequency range nominated that have ERPs that far exceed 50kW. I imagine another round of edumaction is in order.

Of course, I expect that the explanation offered will probably be something along the lines of "I was talking ERP in the first point, then total radiated in the second point and then back to ERP in the other points" or that "There's only a few examples of Australian DVB-t transmissions in the frequency ranger that have ERPs that exceed 50kW" - completely ignoring that this contradicts the statement made.

Let's see how things turn out, eh? ^_^


*quoted incase of 'accidental' post alteration

Edited by DrP, 21 July 2011 - 07:29 AM.


#3 alanh

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Posted 21 July 2011 - 02:05 PM

These are current figures not those released at the time of the switchoff which is when I posted that the only band 1 digital transmitters were off shore.
What all very low powered and there is only 2 % of broadcasters? I understand that these broadcasters are regretting this allocation due to impulse noise from a US source.

It would appear that ATSC needs to use more power to get the same reliable coverage.

AlanH

#4 viewer

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Posted 21 July 2011 - 02:23 PM

I can't seem to get these on my digital ready antenna.

Are they going to be on VAST, or do I need a different antenna / dish ?

#5 alanh

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Posted 21 July 2011 - 02:31 PM

The post I made was nearly 2 and a half years ago.
All but 2 % voted with their feet.

AlanH

#6 DrP

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Posted 21 July 2011 - 03:01 PM

These are current figures not those released at the time of the switchoff which is when I posted that the only band 1 digital transmitters were off shore.

At the time you made the claim that there were no low VHF transmissions in operation the USA 'analogue switch off' had well and truly completed and the low VHF transmissions had been in operation for quite some time. If need be your original post can be linked, along with documentation clearly demonstrating US digital television transmissions where you say they weren't. Hopefully you don't need to be further embarrassed into admitting you were talking through your 'hat' (as usual).

----------

Oh dear. It looks like the dreaded 'edit pixie' has been at work and the comparatively recent statement by alanh proclaiming there were no low VHF ATSC transmissions in the USA appears to have mysteriously vanished. Oh well, I guess this means there's going to be quite a lot of quoting of alanh to ensure that 'edit pixie' doesn't destroy more of his posts. Still, it does prove interesting that rather than simply admit mistake, the 'edit pixie' is called in to clean things up in an attempt to avoid embarassment.

Edited by DrP, 21 July 2011 - 03:23 PM.


#7 viewer

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Posted 21 July 2011 - 04:00 PM

The post I made was nearly 2 and a half years ago.
All but 2 % voted with their feet.

AlanH



I don't follow...the first post is by you dated Posted Today, 02:18 AM

You say it was posted 2 odd years ago??

Are you on a different year to us? How can "today" be two and a half years ago??

#8 mtv

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Posted 21 July 2011 - 04:20 PM

It appears the 'confidentiality agreement' now has company... the 'edit pixie'.

#9 MLXXX

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Posted 21 July 2011 - 11:16 PM

I did find this in another thread:


However there is no digital transmitter allocations to channels 2 - 6 because of

Yes, none at all.


It appears the 'confidentiality agreement' now has company... the 'edit pixie'.

Dear Alanh,
for some time you've had special editing privileges. (This may date back to a time when you had a need to maintain pinned threads.)

I find that I have the capacity to edit old posts, and I think the "system" granted this to me automatically when my post count reached a certain figure.

I would suggest to you that you consider asking that your editing privileges be reset to the norm for a person with a high post count, i.e. ability to edit your old posts, but with a compulsory "edited by" tag being generated.

In this way you would be incapable of mistakenly activating suppression of the "edited by" tag and there would be one less battle for you to fight. The battle I'm referring to are the allegations being made that you are secretly editing old posts.

Regards,
MLXXX

#10 DrP

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Posted 22 July 2011 - 05:34 AM

Thankyou MLXXX, not the post I was after but this one still demonstrates the point quite nicely. At the time alanh was telling people there were no low VHF ATSC transmissions there were and they had been operating for some time.

#11 newtaste

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Posted 30 July 2015 - 06:26 PM

Dyle Mobile TV, the mobile version of ATSC that was available in some US cities, has been terminated.

As of May 22, 2015, Dyle® mobile TV is no longer in service, and Dyle-enabled devices and their apps will no longer be supported.

http://www.dyle.tv/



#12 alanh

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Posted 30 July 2015 - 06:42 PM

New Taste,

This service was the addition of a low data rate MPEG-4 signal with more error correction  which was added to existing broadcasts.

 

It was probably squashed by the Telcos. The National Association of Broadcasters in the USA has found that 80 % of smart phones do not have the FM receiver activated on purchase. This pushes the users to use apps and the data has to flow through Telcos adding to their profits.

 

DVB-T2 in Europe also has a lite function for transmission to hand held devices. It is designed to minimise battery consumption. I haven't seen widespread adoption in smart phones. The only broadcast video service which is commonly available is a DMB (the DAB+ radio but with MPEG-4 video added) in South Korea.

 

Alanh



#13 Malich

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Posted 30 July 2015 - 07:52 PM

It was probably squashed by the Telcos.

 

Unlikely. Dyle had some big names behind it, including NBC/Universal, Fox, Ltd. News, Cox, Hearst, etc. It also wasn't something the telcos could block/disable, since it used add-on hardware and a 3rd-party app.

 

No, what probably killed it was the same thing you touched on in your 3rd paragraph: nobody was interested, and anyone who was bought a proper ATSC tuner add-on for their tablet/phone. The last version of the Dyle app seems to have had <5000 downloads, compared to multiple other apps for full-blown ATSC phone/tablet tuners that each have 100,000-500,000 in a similar timeframe...



#14 mel816

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Posted 04 August 2015 - 05:51 AM

New Taste,

This service was the addition of a low data rate MPEG-4 signal with more error correction  which was added to existing broadcasts.

 

It was probably squashed by the Telcos. The National Association of Broadcasters in the USA has found that 80 % of smart phones do not have the FM receiver activated on purchase. This pushes the users to use apps and the data has to flow through Telcos adding to their profits.

 

DVB-T2 in Europe also has a lite function for transmission to hand held devices. It is designed to minimise battery consumption. I haven't seen widespread adoption in smart phones. The only broadcast video service which is commonly available is a DMB (the DAB+ radio but with MPEG-4 video added) in South Korea.

 

Alanh

There's also the One-Seg mobile TV service in Japan and other countries that use ISDB-T.



#15 alanh

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Posted 04 August 2015 - 03:23 PM

ISDB-T has been sold in South America and a few African countries on the basis they can transmit signals to mobile phones.

ASTC is a single carrier system so you cannot reduce the bandwidth of the main transmitter and add a separate signal for mobiles. ISDB-T like DVB-T are multicarrier systems and this is feasible. In DVB-T2lite has the same function.

 

Alanh



#16 Malich

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Posted 04 August 2015 - 04:07 PM

ASTC is a single carrier system so you cannot reduce the bandwidth of the main transmitter and add a separate signal for mobiles. ISDB-T like DVB-T are multicarrier systems and this is feasible. In DVB-T2lite has the same function.

 

No, it's very difficult/impossible to do it in DVB-T - the carrier allocation structure simply doesn't lend itself to reducing RF bandwidth to accomodate mobile signals in a shared broadcast. DVB-H is timesliced into the broadcast; while DVB-T2lite is both timesliced and distributed on a subset of the OFDM carriers.

 

ISDB-T with its segmented nature is the only one where the mobile user effectively receives a narrow(er) bandwidth signal from a larger shared broadcast...