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Wall Mounting Guide 101


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#1 diesel

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Posted 08 November 2008 - 11:36 AM

Fellow DTV members and readers, below is a guide I have put together to try and answer some of the queries we get on the forum from users looking for wall mounting advice. Itís a start and maybe I can get it pinned as a sticky, but I welcome any feedback to try and improve the content.
Cheers Mick.



WALL MOUNT INSTALLATION GUIDE 101

This guide is only meant to serve as reference and hopefully act as a starting point for anyone who is interested in what wall mounting solutions are available in the market and also what maybe involved if you want to tackle it yourself. If you are unsure, please use a professional to install your TV on a wall mount. Most electrical retailers will have contractors they use/recommend or most electricians are also capable.

Well done!
So you have bought your new flat panel TV and now would like to mount it on the wall. Where do you start?

Which Wall Mount?[UPDATE]
There are a few different types of wall mounts
1. Fixed Ė usually small profile (~10-50mm) and allow very little (if any) movement of the panel once mounted in position. Recently Samsung has offered a 'Picture Hanging" style kit that has the TV back resting on the wall. Be aware that heat/ventilation issues need to be considered and these low profile mounts mean cable connections cannot protrude straight back to the wall. You'll need 900 elbows or a thicker mount if your TV connections don't point down/sideways. The other option is to get recessed wall plates for power points and cable connections.
Pros: they are neat and have the panel sitting very close to the wall.
Cons: connecting new cables and rear ventilation may be an issue
2. Tilt Ė larger profile than fixed and allow downward tilt of 150-300 (some are fixed at an angle, others are adjustable, and some also allow upward tilt).
Pros: can reduce reflections on plasma screens by tilting downward. Allow easier movement for adding new cables in the future
Cons: usually stick out from the wall a little more that a fixed mount - ~90-150mm
3. Articulated Ė fully flexible mount that can tilt and swivel in a wide range
Pros: big range of movement that allows user to position screen to their liking
Cons: more expensive than fixed or tilt mount. Can have a larger profile than tilt mounts.
4. Ceiling Ė designed more for work/office environments
Pros: don't need a wall nearby to mount. Keep the screen up high out of harms way. Have ample room inside the tubing for cabling
Cons: Screens are fairly high. Not ideal for HT use.
5. Motorised - allow TVs to be remotely moved or hidden away when not in use
Pros: Can make TVs disappear into custom built furniture
Cons: expensive, expensive. I assume the motor mechanism takes up some room

Suppliers: Wall mounts
TV Manufacturers can supply OEM wall mounts, though most TVs come with the table top stand as standard equipment. Wall mounts are usually an extra item but manufacturer wall mounts are usually very overpriced (~$700) when considered against aftermarket suppliers.
Some aftermarket manufacturers are;
Selby Acoustics
Skunkworks
Crest
Vogels, CLO, Peerless, Venturi
Adtec
Audio Visual devices
UltraLift
Jaycar

Suppliers: Accessories
EZYHD - HDMI cables, [/b]Recessed wallplates
DSE - 900 HDMI elbow
Cablechick - wallplates
alectro - wallplates
Selby Acoustics - wall plates and cables


Ready to Install?
All TV manuals have some general rules about wall mounting TVs, and all wall mounts have instructions attached...well at least the ones I have seen. I have some basic steps listed below followed by some links to more guides that I have found on the interweb. Thereís also a bunch of wall mount threads in the HDTV Sub Forum. I suggest using the search function with the words ďwall+mountĒ.
Depending on how handy you are, wall mounting can be pretty easy. The difficulties lay in making sure you don't cut any plumbing or electrical cables behind the wall and any electric rewiring (eg new power points) should only be done by an authorised electrician.

In the below instructions, the wall mount is the bit that attaches to the wall, and the brackets are the bits that attach to the back of the TV. My suggestions on wall mounting are;

1. Probably a good starting point is to place a cardboard cut-out the size of your screen onto the wall where you want to mount it. Then, you can sit back on your couch and take a look at where is a suitable location and more importantly, a suitable height. [UPDATE]Panasonic have launched a pretty cool app that can make an altered reality of where you are looking to mount your TV so you can kinda see what it looks like - Panasonic Viera AR Setup Simulator
Itís all up to personal taste, but most people seem to agree that having either the middle or bottom of the screen at eye-level is the ideal height. (500-850mm from floor to base of screen).
My preference is for the TV to be mounted about 850mm between the bottom of the screen to the floor, based on my entertainment unit being 700mm high.

2. Look around and take note of your surroundings - notice where power points, windows, antenna outputs etc are located, and don't forget to consider what's on the other side of the wall. If there is a bathroom or Hot Water heater on the other side, there may also be some plumbing in the cavity you need to watch out for.
Generally speaking, mounting on a wall that is on the external perimeter of the house is a lot easier than an internal wall.

3. Once you have sorted out the location, use a stud finder to locate the studs in a brick veneer wall, or maybe a magnet in a metal frame house. Studs are usually 450-600mm apart. If they are off centre, you can either mount the bracket off centre and thereís enough panel width to ensure the TV will be centred once mounted, or attach some thick plywood to the studs, and then attach the wall mount to the plywood.
You can skip this step for a double brick wall.

4. Mark your holes for the wall mount (make sure it's level) and mark the access holes to feed AV leads from the TV down to the entertainment unit below.

5. Drill your first wall mount hole and use either wall plugs and screws or dynabolts for masonary wall mounting. These should be provided with the mount.
For brick veneer walls, drill pilot holes (that are much smaller diameter than the screws you will use), then you can use the screws provided with the wall mount. Make sure you add a little lubricant like grease to ensure the screws don't snap, and take it slow. If you have no screws, then use some big coach screws and use a ratchet to screw them in. You can get this hardware from your local Hardware store eg Bunnings, Mitre 10 etc.
Note: wood and metal screws have different thread patterns, so use the appropriate ones for your installation.

6. Once you've drilled the first hole, mount the wall bracket onto the wall and mark the 2nd hole, making sure again that the bracket is level (perpendicular to the floor). Drill this hole and screw/bolt the mount firmly onto the wall. Now drill and attach the remaining screws/bolts. Usually two will be sufficient to hold most TVs, but having 4 screws/bolts is like having a belt and braces too.

Now attach the brackets onto the back of the TV and the TV is just about ready to go on to the wall.

7. Drill or cut out your core holes for the cables to pass through. In a brick wall I suggest drilling smaller holes around the diameter of your hole (maybe 6) and then punching out the remaining centre brick piece with a hammer and chisel. You can use wall plates (like for power points) to finish it off or those desktop grommets like on computer desks.

8. If you mount the TV low enough, usually you wonít have a noggin between the top and bottom cable holes. If there is a noggin blocking cables from being fed from one hole to the next, you have two options;
i) buy 4 drill bit extenders, attach a 20mm speed bore, remove some roof tiles and drill a hole through the top plate, then through any noggins until you get through the offending noggin; or
ii) using a jigsaw, cut a notch out of the noggin - donít go too deep. This will mean you will now have a hole to patch up, but itís a lot easier than option (i). The patch is still usually behind the TV and so will be covered up.

9. Feed your cables through the holes and attach to the back of the TV. I use yellow tongue (itís the yellow plastic joining strip between two chipboard flooring panels) to assist by taping the cables to one end and feeding the yellow tongue through first.
Whilst youíre at it, I suggest you also feed through a pull string at least three times the length of the distance between the holes, so you can pull any future cables through by attaching to the string. Itís also not a bad idea to add an extra cable(s) if you know you will be adding gear in the near future. Much easier now than once the TVís in the way.

10. Now mount your TV, connect the other ends of the cables to your AV gear and your away. If your TV is not quite level, you can use some cardboard or the like to prop one end up slightly.

11. If you are renting and donít want to cut holes in the wall, Vogels have Hide-a-Wire and some mounts with integrated cable management between TV and Entertainment Unit shelves, or you can use cable conduits (square tubing with a removable lid) available from Hardware stores or Electrical suppliers (eg Turks, etc)



Links:
Now for some links to some other guides and videos -

YouTube

How to: Wall mounting a LCD or Plasma

Plasma TV Installation Guide (2)

How to Wall Mount a Plasma

Introduction to Wall Mounting a Flat Panel LCD or Plasma TV

Öand for anyone whoís interested this is the one I chose Ė PLSM002
Good Luck and happy mounting ;)

Edited by diesel, 19 December 2011 - 08:29 AM.


#2 gbang007

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Posted 09 November 2008 - 01:51 AM

thanks for the awsome guide! massive help. I got one dilemma, i am getting a new tv next week and have been plannaing the install. I am going to mount it on the wall with a bracket thats has a small tilt. I have found the studs etc but i wanted to also hide the cables so it looks cleaner. but, i have a noggin in the way and i am on the bottom floor of a two story house. i dont really facny ripping any large chucnks out of the walla and drilling holes through the noggin. does anyone have any ideas about getting through this? if not, i might just have to neatly arrange it down the side of my wall.

#3 diesel

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Posted 09 November 2008 - 07:59 AM

Other than cutting a hole in the wall, I would suggest using a product like this wall conduit and paint it the same colour as the wall, but the better finish would be to cut, pull cable through and patch'n'paint.

#4 digitalhome

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Posted 10 November 2008 - 04:33 PM

Geez mate, this tutorial is going to put me out of a job! :lol: All I can say to owners is don't follow this advice if you have any doubts. I have been to many homes helping the owner's sweeping up glass, plastic etc. where the panel has fallen off the wall. However, good work Diesel for the commitment you put into the tutorial.

#5 ...

...

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Posted 11 November 2008 - 07:34 AM

Nice work there diesel! :)

However I have to agree with digitalhome here, you have to make a judgement on your DIY skills as a very expensive investment errrr... hangs in the balance so to speak. Domestic insurance is unlikely to cover the replacement of the screen on a non-professional install.....

That being said I have enough confidence in my own abilities to give it a whirl when I eventually move to a bigger place.

#6 diesel

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Posted 11 November 2008 - 07:45 AM

Fair enough guys, and that's a point I make very clear at the end of the post. If you are confident, then go ahead and do it, it's not that hard, but if not, get a professional. Certainly all electrical work should be done by a qualified electrician.
The other point I would make is that there is also a bunch of other reference material in the OP as well, eg different mount types, suppliers etc that allow users to at least see what is available.

Would you suggest I move the below part of the post to the top of the OP???

This guide is only meant to serve as reference and hopefully act as a starting point for anyone who is interested in what wall mounting solutions are available in the market and also what maybe involved if you want to tackle it yourself. If you are unsure, please use a professional to install your TV on a wall mount. Most electrical retailers will have contractors they use/recommend or most electricians are also capable.



#7 ...

...

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Posted 11 November 2008 - 08:54 AM

Would you suggest I move the below part of the post to the top of the OP???

Yes, I think that might be a good idea as many posters will find the info they need and not bother reading all the way to the end.....

#8 nis200979

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Posted 11 November 2008 - 09:41 AM

One important difference for tilt brackets is some are fixed tilt, others are adjustable tilt.

What about electronic wall supports, controlled by infrared, power sensing, RS232, etc.

And high end concealed moving panel mounts.

Of interest to many may be the coloumn system by Vogel's or hidewire style conduits. The column system alleviates the need for a tv cabinet or concealing cables throught the wall.

#9 diesel

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Posted 11 November 2008 - 11:41 AM

Yes, I think that might be a good idea as many posters will find the info they need and not bother reading all the way to the end.....

Done

#10 diesel

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Posted 11 November 2008 - 11:53 AM

One important difference for tilt brackets is some are fixed tilt, others are adjustable tilt.
I'll add this in

What about electronic wall supports, controlled by infrared, power sensing, RS232, etc.
And high end concealed moving panel mounts.
Happy to include some references, though I was targeting this guide more to novices/new buyers who are maybe considering a DIY solution. The panels etc you mention would in all liklihood be professionally installed anyway ( or at least by someone who knows what they are doing).
PM some links if you can



Of interest to many may be the coloumn system by Vogel's or hidewire style conduits. The column system alleviates the need for a tv cabinet or concealing cables throught the wall.

Noted, I had included a reference to Vogels in the OP. I might include some direct links?

Vogels, CLO, Peerless, Venturi

11. If you are renting and donít want to cut holes in the wall, Vogels have some mounts with integrated cable management between TV and Entertainment Unit shelves, or you can use cable conduits (square tubing with a removable lid) available from Hardware stores or Electrical suppliers (eg Turks, etc)


Edited by diesel, 11 November 2008 - 11:54 AM.


#11 nis200979

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Posted 11 November 2008 - 12:56 PM

Noted, I had included a reference to Vogels in the OP. I might include some direct links?


Vogel's Glider @ $1299

http://www.vogels.co...ils.aspx?id=844

Plugs in with a standard powerplug. DIY, no electrician required.

The screen powers off the bracket - Automatically retracts when screen is turned off.

Also includes infrared remote with 2 presets plus home.

#12 isilver

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Posted 11 November 2008 - 08:43 PM

Excellent thread diesel, thanks for the info.

Edited by isilver, 11 November 2008 - 09:12 PM.


#13 diesel

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Posted 11 November 2008 - 09:25 PM

isilver, in answer to your question before you edited your post, have a look at this post from HD Rocks

Someone on Ebay offering installs for $299 bracket included in Melbourne area.

Here http://tinyurl.com/6nzamu

Hdrocks: B) When its hanging from a wall.


Edited by diesel, 11 November 2008 - 09:37 PM.


#14 Mr.Bitey

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Posted 11 November 2008 - 10:17 PM

Looks good - you can get that yellow tongue stuff (its about 1cm wide, 3-4mm thick length of semi flexible plastic - flexible enough to bend up a hole in gyprock, and stiff enough to force its way up/down a wall cavity) from electrical wholesalers like P&R electircal - from memory its about $20 for 4 meters (could be a bit cheaper)

Do you have the sizings of the coach screws? like a 40mm M8 or M6 (examples only - i dont know which ones you should use ;-)... ? (you know the length and guage stuff :) it might be helpful for ppls to just go look at the HW store or ask for 4 x XXXXX bolts, or 4 x XXXXX screws / coach bolts

PS: White Van Installation Services (a subsiduary of White Van Professional Calibration Services) - PM me for rates ;-)

EDIT: Yellow Tongue isnt what its really called - but most tradies know the stuff :-) - the yellow and red stuff is actually used to hold floorboards together - so you might be able to find some in some housing construction bins (thers always offcuts).. or the commercial stuff is a greyish plastic (like from P&R)... The pro's use a metal version thats like a long coiled spring - more flexible and stiffer to punch through trouble spots ;)

Cheers,
Sourcey

Edited by mr.bitey, 11 November 2008 - 10:19 PM.


#15 isilver

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Posted 11 November 2008 - 10:35 PM

isilver, in answer to your question before you edited your post, have a look at this post from HD Rocks



Thanks for the info, I edited my post because I felt like I was hi-jacking your fine thread!

#16 LastMile

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Posted 12 November 2008 - 10:27 AM

Does anyone know whether there is something like PowerBridge available in Australia?

Seems like a good way to run a wall mounted screen from a decent UPS.

#17 Mr.Bitey

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Posted 12 November 2008 - 10:41 AM

Just get a sparky to plumb you in a outlet behind the screen (and while theyre there, theyve got all the tools & extensions to cut holes in noggins via the roof too :-), or make a cutout in the gyprock and get the sparky to mount a power socket on it, or on the side of a stud or top or noggin..

Looks like with powerbridge you still gotta get a sparky to do the in-wall wiring, all its really doing is giving you a male-socket for you to plug a normal power cord in at the other end (non tv end)... its just like an extension cord, but with wall plates (and legal to put in wall cavities!)

Cheers,
Zappey

#18 h45e

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Posted 12 November 2008 - 01:55 PM

What about a guide into brick?

#19 gbang007

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Posted 12 November 2008 - 10:16 PM

what type of bolts should i be looking at to mount into a wooden stud? dynabolts?

#20 diesel

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Posted 13 November 2008 - 09:57 AM

What about a guide into brick?
Throughout the guide I have made references tio brick walss as well. generally they are very similar process. I have outlined below the most obvious differences.
5. Drill your first wall mount hole and use either wall plugs and screws or dynabolts for masonary wall mounting.
7. Drill or cut out your core holes for the cables to pass through. In a brick wall I suggest drilling smaller holes around the diameter of your hole (maybe 6) and then punching out the remaining centre brick piece with a hammer and chisel. You can use wall plates (like for power points) to finish it off or those desktop grommets like on computer desks.
11. If you are renting and donít want to cut holes in the wall, Vogels have some Hide-a-wire and mounts with integrated cable management between TV and Entertainment Unit shelves,



what type of bolts should i be looking at to mount into a wooden stud? dynabolts?

For brick veneer walls, drill pilot holes (that are much smaller diameter than the screws you will use), then you can use the screws provided with the wall mount or if none, then use some big coach screws and use a ratchet to screw them in. You can get this hardware from your local Hardware store eg Bunnings, Mitre 10 etc.



#21 nis200979

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Posted 13 November 2008 - 12:18 PM

what type of bolts should i be looking at to mount into a wooden stud? dynabolts?


Most brands will provide timber stud bolts, and masonary bolts/plugs in the box.

#22 diesel

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Posted 14 November 2008 - 07:22 AM

Most brands will provide timber stud bolts, and masonary bolts/plugs in the box.

As well as a variety of sizes of bolts to mount the brackets onto th back of the TV

#23 The Witzl

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Posted 14 November 2008 - 04:08 PM

Awesome write up Mick!
I'd love to wall mount my plasma, but im renting and i CBF patching up the holes when i move out. Plus i think my property manager would freak out and dob me into the owner!!

Just FYI on the suppliers of brackets - Jaycar has three models which are a fair bit cheaper than most of the stuff you find in the major outlets. Specs and build quality seem to be up there with the mid-range stuff too.
Obviously the big brand stuff is really hot.... but if like me you think that $300 for a hunk of metal is a little over the top, then this is a pretty good option.

http://www.jaycar.co...w.asp?ID=CW2826

http://www.jaycar.co...w.asp?ID=CW2822

http://www.jaycar.co...w.asp?ID=CW2824

#24 smj

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Posted 16 November 2008 - 08:38 AM

I'm curious if people think the money saved by mounting it yourself is worth the effort?
I like to save money where I can - I'd like to put the extra money into the TV itself, but I'm concerned that I'll get halfway into it and wish I'd just paid to have it installed professionally.
Any comments from people who don't have much handyman experience?

#25 diesel

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Posted 16 November 2008 - 10:29 AM

All I can say is if you are not sure, pay someone to do it.

Every installation is different. Mounting on the interior side of an external wall of a brick veneer single story house is probably the easiest, and then they get harder from there.
I found my installation very easy as I was repainting interior walls anyway, so I could patch and paint any holes I needed, which wasn't required for the wall mount, but was required for my speaker wires and antenna cabling. My old TV was previously in a corner, so with the new one I moved it to the centre of the wall (after ripping out an old slow combustion fireplace which was in the way).