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#1 alanh

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Posted 02 February 2005 - 09:48 PM

All,

Analog TV switchoffs are;
All of coastal Queensland from Wide Bay northward as well as the Darling and Southern Downs. on 6thDecember 2011
Remote Qld (TEN, Impaja and Southern Cross) between 10th December 2013


South of Toowoomba and South West
Augathella, Injune, Tambo, Springsure area
Surrounding Wide Bay area centred on Taroom
Capella, Barcaldine, Aramac area
North and North West of Rockhampton
Richmond, Hughenden and surrounds
Inland from Mackay centred on Glenden
Palm Islands and inland from Townsville
Inland and North of Cairns
Remote areas
If you are within the yellow area you can get 16 channels authorised for your satellite receiver now. See below.

Signal Sources

Terrestrial
broadcast transmission needs a TV antenna designed to cover only the radio frequency channels used by the transmitters on your local transmitter site.

Satellite broadcasting need a "Ku" band antenna dish for Australian broadcasting (Pay and Free to air). All domestic systems are encrypted.

Internet provides the user requested program downloads from ISPs or program providers.

Disc replay Blu-ray and Digital Video Discs are not covered here

All digital transmission systems will either faithfully reproduce what is being sent, the pictures will breakup into blocks with sound going on and off or a frozen image and silence. The frozen image can be replaced with a "no signal" sign. This is often called the digital cliff and can occur if the signal is too weak or too strong. Other than this the antenna system does not affect picture or sound quality. High Definition and Standard Definition signals share the same transmitted signal.

Obtaining broadcast signals.


Determine the most likely source
1. Type your exact street address.

2. On the "MySwitch" website click on the "Transmitter Information" on the lower left side. Compare the previous map to the current map. If both transmitters are in the same pink or blue colour pick the transmitter closest to you. Viewers in the Northern Beaches, northern shore of Sydney Harbour between the bridge and the heads, Eastern Suburbs and those in the suburbs between the CBD and the Airport must do this.

3. Now click on the ACMA Out of licence area reception form B58

Subsidies Beware that subsidies are available for those on full pensions and those who have been using an analog translator which is not converted to digital. The subsidy is not available if you buy your satellite receiver more than 6 months before analog switchoff in your region. Subsidies are not available if you can already view digital TV. DBCDE Household Assistance Scheme and DBCDE Satellite Subsidy Scheme

Determine the type of receiver required for digital television
There are two groups of receivers
Ground based (Terrestrial) transmission or Satellite Based Transmission

Terrestrial receiver
This receiver should be capable of receiving the following program streams;
All areas: ABC1 – ABC3, ABC24, SBSHD, SBS2, One, Eleven, 7Mate, 7Two, GEM, Go!
Southern Cross, 7Qld, WIN
Remote area: Replace the above line for TEN, Southern Cross, Imparja.

This receiver TV, Personal Video Recorder or Set Top Box is usually called HD and should comply to
Australian Standard 4933.1-2010 Digital Television – Requirements for receivers – VHF/UHF DVB-T Television Broadcasts. (High Definition, MPEG4 capable)
Do not buy Standard Definition Set Top Boxes as you will not get a full range of programs. High Definition Set Top Boxes can provide signals to old type receivers.

Satellite Receiver

Those who are currently using Aurora, will have to replace this receiver by the end of 2013. If the dish, cabling etc are ok, only the receiver needs replacing. Replacing the TV with a new widescreen TV will show the programs in the best quality.
VAST Receiver Specifications.

Reception is only possible when authorised. This is covered later in this post.

Antenna signal distribution from the antenna
In single dwellings a splitter may be used to feed up to typically 4 outlets. (However, this depends on signal strength as splitters reduce the signal strength.)

Multiple dwelling blocks use Master Antenna TV systems (MATV) which consist of a single antenna followed by an amplifier, which in bigger systems use a separate amplifier for each terrestrial channel. Satellite MATV systems also contain a pair of amplifiers, one for vertically polarised satellite signals and a second amplifier for horizontally polarised signals.
MATV systems can also carry digital radio signals. (DAB+ and DRM+)

Please note that channelised MATV systems the amplifiers have to be replaced or retuned to the new digital channels.

Antenna Installers
Use an endorsed digital installer.
List of installers' names.

There is a new Australian Standard for TV antennas AS 1417.1(Int)-2011
All installations should be to Australian Standard 1367:2007 (ignoring the analog TV requirements) These standards is not compulsory but ensures reliable reception in single and multiple dwellings.

For MATV systems please read this handbook.

Which antenna should be installed?

From the map on "MySwitch"
Dark Pink indicates prime reception area. Antennas with only a few dB are ok if they are elevated outside
Light Pink High gain (highest number of dB)
Dark Blue Use the blocked signal path recommendation with a masthead amplifier. Antenna may be
Light Blue Use the blocked signal path recommendations with a masthead amplifier. Antenna is 10 m above the ground.
Note: These recommendations are subject digital signal measurements to the requirements of AS1367:2007 (without analog requirement).

Don't Get Ripped Off! Do not install antennas designed for analog channels 0 – 5A. About 30% of the metal work will or is not used any more. Furthermore these antennas can make reception less reliable. The antenna should not be more than 750 mm wide.

Antenna Types Drawings

Whilst they still exist, analog channels within the antenna channel range will be receivable.

Read the Transmitter List

The best antenna is one designed for the TV channels to be received in your area. This is because all of the metal work will get used. This gives greater sensitivity to the channels you want and less to the unwanted ones.

"Antenna Replace"
White text on red background
This shows which sites have analog transmissions on channels below channel 6.

"Antenna Replace"
Red print. on pale blue background
A change in UHF band. Only replace antenna if the signals break up which may be weather dependent.

Write down the antenna type for the transmission site you wish to use.

Now click on the antenna type from the transmitter list to see your options for your antenna.
H3
H4
H4+
H5
HWb


V5

H34
H34+
H35

C34
C34+




Caravans/Marine Band 3, 4 - 5


Digital Dividend – The selling of RF Channels 52 – 69 will require changes in the channels used. The required channel changes will occur in 2014.

The plan is for a pair of national broadcasters, three commercial broadcasters and a community broadcaster. This uses 6 channels.

The plan is to put all the transmitters on a single site into one of these groups
Using the Antenna Types in the transmitter lists these types fit the new channel groups.
H3 or V3 Channels 6 - 8, 10 – 12
H4 or V4 Channels 28 – 33
H4+ or V4+ Channels 34 -39
H5 or V5 Channels 40 – 45
H5 or V5 Channels 46 - 51
The ACMA is trying to restack the digital channels on each site to be within the antenna type already in use.
This will remove the requirement for Channel 27 – 69 (HWb and VWb type) antennas so that more sensitive narrow band antennas can be used for no change in price.
Hopefully this will remove the requirements for C## type antennas. This only applies to Canberra, Manning River, MIA, Goulburn Valley, Wide Bay, Gladstone East.
* Example 1: Darwin will not require any changes because they are already using channels 29 – 33.
* Example 2: Main transmitters (shown in bold) in mainland state capital cities require an H34 antenna. In 2014 SBS and community TV will change to band 3.
Then the best antenna is only an H3. Existing H34 antennas will be fine for the rest of their natural life. This does not apply to translators.

It is the Building owner's responsibility to upgrade to digital reception. See MATV above. This also applies to rental houses.

Indoor Antennas

Indoor antennas generally produce unreliable reception; however here are some guidelines if you wish to try one in a prime reception area.

Cabling
It should be quad shielded RG6 with F connectors at any joins.
This is to minimise the pick up of electrical switching and TV signals other than picked up by the antenna.

Masthead amplifiers Should only be considered if the measured digital signals show there is too little signal. If that is not an option try the above techniques first.

Radio – Digital radio and FM

Digital Radio
DAB+ used in all mainland state capitals, with trials in Canberra and Darwin. Use a band 3 Yagi-Uda antenna with its elements vertical with respect to the horizon.

FM
None of the antennas listed above are designed to receive FM radio. The best way is to have an independent system Please read FM Antennas

DRM+ if used will use what was being used for analog TV channels 0 – 2.
DRM30 is another type of digital radio which will replace AM radio and will not use any of the above equipment. Not on

Free to Air Satellite TV – Viewer Access Satellite Television (VAST)

This satellite service is paid for by the Commonwealth Government to provide TV to remote areas of Australia. There is 3 licence areas
Southern: It covers inland NSW, SA and small areas of Victoria and Tasmania.
those who can prove that there is insufficient signal available at 10 m above the ground.

[url="http://%22http//www.digitalready.gov.au/what-is-the-switch/VAST-service.aspx""]Viewer Access Satellite Television[/url]

For more information
How to get into Digital TV Pt 2 -What to do about the antenna "Silicon Chip" April 2008
For TV Antenna Basics +
For Radio Digital Television and Radio - Off-Topic Thread

AlanH

:wacko: Please post any queries in this geographic viewer's forum

Edited by alanh, 25 June 2012 - 06:13 PM.


#2 alanh

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Posted 23 August 2005 - 11:40 PM

All,
Mount Isa added

AlanH

#3 steveinqld

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Posted 05 January 2007 - 11:58 PM

To alanh in particular (or anyone who can answer),

I live in Central Queensland, and I receive my digital transmission from Rockhampton (MT Hopeful).

I can receive ABC and WIN (9) (The VHF channels) very well, but only marginally 7, 10 and SBS (UHF channels).

The document http://www.dtvforum....t...ost&id=1282 "Australian TV channel allocations" states that I need a Band 3 antenna only for digital, however if I understand what I have read about antennas given that Rockhampton transmits digital on channels 11, 12, 36, 37, 38 shouldn't I need also a band 4 or 5 antenna (preferably band 5 for the "spares 40 and 44". Is this a mistake in the document?

Cheers,

Steve

#4 wahroonga farm

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Posted 06 January 2007 - 07:03 AM

Hi steve,

Your spot on. Channels are correct but antenna assumption is not. So the document is incorrect for Rocky.

However to accommodate the spare (band 5 channels) and the existing digital UHF (band 4 channels) you will need a UHF WB (Band 4 + band 5) or a Band 4+ antenna.

You can confirm the Rockhampton channel allocations here.

#5 steveinqld

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Posted 06 January 2007 - 08:53 AM

Hi steve,

Your spot on. Channels are correct but antenna assumption is not. So the document is incorrect for Rocky.

However to accommodate the spare (band 5 channels) and the existing digital UHF (band 4 channels) you will need a UHF WB (Band 4 + band 5) or a Band 4+ antenna.

You can confirm the Rockhampton channel allocations here.


Thanks for confirming that, I'll post a new thread in this area to help me choose the best antenna for Rockhampton.

Steve

#6 geesey

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Posted 06 January 2007 - 09:49 AM

I have problems with Channel 10 (tried posting in regional posts) pixellating, etc.
This only started just after Xmas but now has escalated to the point where I can't view Channel 10 at all.
I only have very occasional problems with the other digital channels (mostly SBS and Ch7).
My transmitter is Mount Stuart, Townsville with Channel 10 being Southern Cross Ten.
I have a Topfield TF5000PVRt. When I installed it over 12 months ago I had virutally no problems with any channels. I have a clear line of sight to the transmitter tower at Mount Stuart. I have not amde any changes since the original installation and am using the original outdoor uhf/vhf TV Antenna that came with the house when we moved in 10 years ago.
Do I need to think about upgrading the antenna?
Thanks

#7 wahroonga farm

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Posted 06 January 2007 - 10:10 AM

The old antenna should work, but sounds like something has degraded.

Also check that the stb isn't tuning one of the other Townsville blackspot translators. ie Mount Stuart Southern Cross Ten (TNQ) = UHF Ch 36

Details here.

#8 geesey

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Posted 06 January 2007 - 10:42 AM

The old antenna should work, but sounds like something has degraded.

Also check that the stb isn't tuning one of the other Townsville blackspot translators. ie Mount Stuart Southern Cross Ten (TNQ) = UHF Ch 36

Details here.

Thanks for the quick reply.
Yes it is definitely tuning Ch 36. I am watching it now and there are no reception problems at all.
Generally I can't watch at all during the day.
It must be something at the Channel 10 end. I heard they made some changes to their HDTV signals just after Xmas.

#9 alanh

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Posted 06 January 2007 - 12:32 PM

steveinqld,
You are right at band 3 antenna is wrong. I have spent some days recently on all those lists. I have eradicated that type of error from the definitions used to calculate the band. After Sunday I will be able to obtain the latest lists from the ACMA on digital installations and then I will put updated and corrected posts on.
I have just checked my new tables. It says band 3 for the ABC and band 5 for the rest.

Thanks for the pickup.

Wahroonga Farm.
Mt Stuart is the main transmitter site. The translator sites of Stuart and Townsville North use band 5. Those translators are on a single frequency network.

AlanH

#10 wahroonga farm

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Posted 06 January 2007 - 01:37 PM

Wahroonga Farm.
Mt Stuart is the main transmitter site. The translator sites of Stuart and Townsville North use band 5. Those translators are on a single frequency network. AlanH

I guess that's exactly wot I said. Fortunately Geesey and I understood. :blink:

#11 steveinqld

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Posted 06 January 2007 - 03:50 PM

OK so I don't have access to create a new thread, so I'll write it here.

I live in Biloela, 73km due South of Mount Hopeful (Rockhampton).

I have an antenna on a small tower on my roof that points to Rockhampton and I get quite good reception on my analogue TV of 2,7,9,10 and SBS. (on channels 7,9,28,31 and 34). I do not know what type of antenna I have (I have taken a photo but for some reason cannot upload to my ISP's web space.... if someone can host it I will email to them). I have a Masthead amplifier and a combined powered splitter / powersupply that is labelled as a "Hills PSU1". This feed 2 x analogue tv points throughout my house. All the Coax is Belden-T 9275 DuoFoil Braid 75 Ohm, series 69E86432.

If I bypass the masthead amplifier, my analogue signal is quite poor and barely watchable. If I then use a simple powered splitter I get average analogue signal that would be acceptable to the average person.

What I'm trying to say is that with my current antenna and a masthead amplifier, the picture's fine on an analogue television.

I bought the house with the tv antenna and cabling already in and I have done nothing to it. The masthead amplifier has a date stamped inside it of 1993 and I think this is about the age of the house.

I have used an old Legend SD box for about a year and I get reception of ABC, SBS, 7, 9 and 10. Although the picture is not perfect with some interference, it is OK.

I just bought a Teac DV-B800 HD and this is where my troubles began... :blink:

I get perfect ABC and WIN is good, with some pixelation on WIN HD. I could not get SBS, seven or ten to even tune in.

I checked all the coax connections this morning and found a small short on the masthead, so I fixed that and now I can tune into and sometimes see SBS, seven and ten, although it is totally not watchable. (Q1. Aside question, on seven, ten and sbs the HD channels work more that the SD ones... is that normal??? are they transmitted with more power, bandwidth or error correction or something?).

After reading the posts on this forum I'm considering running quad shield RG6 from my existing antenna through the house to see if that helps the signal strength / quality.

Q2. Would this provide any benefit even if I just terminated it back to a normal coax plug at the one end and open wire at the antenna? The cable run from my masthead amplifier to the splitter is about 15 metres and then about 10 metres to the HD Set Top Box.

Q3. I'm interested in people's opinions of what I should do now. I'd love to be able to show you the photo of my antenna so someone could identify what band it is. I'm prepared to buy a new or additional antenna, if needed but my gut feel is that I'm close to having the necessary signal strength and it may not be that drastic.

Q4. AlanH your latest post recommends a Band 3 for ABC and Band 5 for the rest. Surely you mean Band 3 for ABC and WIN (9)? Why 5 for the rest, any preference over 4+?

Thanks for anyone's help.
Steve

#12 wahroonga farm

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Posted 06 January 2007 - 05:14 PM

I have taken a photo but for some reason cannot upload to my ISP's web space.... if someone can host it I will email to them). ......Steve

Host and link your pics in the attachments section of the forum
http://www.dtvforum....hp?showforum=99
or http://allyoucanupload.webshots.com/

My short answer is that Band 4 is Ch 28 - Ch 35; so entirely possible Ch 36-38 (new digital) are compromised by the antenna?

Here's Alan's pdf modified just for Rocky.

#13 steveinqld

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Posted 06 January 2007 - 05:42 PM

or http://allyoucanupload.webshots.com/



Thanks, I've uploaded two images
Posted Image

and

Posted Image

Edited by steveinqld, 06 January 2007 - 05:48 PM.


#14 wahroonga farm

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Posted 06 January 2007 - 06:04 PM

Hmm cud be band 4 and u cud certainly do with a much higher gain VHF Band 3 and UHF 4+ antenna.

Your in a fringe area. I'd expect to see that antenna in Rocky.

Think antenna & antenna location Ist, 2nd and always.

Where's the masthead?

Marginal analogue gives rubbish digital.

#15 steveinqld

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Posted 06 January 2007 - 06:22 PM

The Antenna is on the very highest part of my roof on a 10m mast.
The masthead amplifier is just out of shot at the bottom of the photo.

Any suggestion on whether replacing the coax cable with quad shield will help?

#16 wahroonga farm

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Posted 06 January 2007 - 06:31 PM

Quad is all about impulse noise interference which u mentioned. I personally suspect it's a bit over rated :blink:.

It won't help the sig/qual.

A BIG antenna in the 'right place' (not necessarily the highest) will (& maybe a low noise /quality masthead).

#17 geesey

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Posted 07 January 2007 - 07:23 AM

Thanks for the quick reply.
Yes it is definitely tuning Ch 36. I am watching it now and there are no reception problems at all.
Generally I can't watch at all during the day.
It must be something at the Channel 10 end. I heard they made some changes to their HDTV signals just after Xmas.

Just tried Ch10 this morning and it is all broken up and pixellated.
I think I will contact Southern Cross before I go buying antennas, etc. :blink:

#18 steveinqld

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Posted 07 January 2007 - 09:14 AM

A BIG antenna in the 'right place' (not necessarily the highest) will (& maybe a low noise /quality masthead).


I'd never thought about the masthead amplifier.

After a quick search of the net the power supply seems to be the same as what is still available - a Hills PSU1 that outputs 26V AC @ 70mA.

The actual masthead amp however is unlike anything I have found. I've uploaded 2 more images.

Masthead Amplifier Box External

Masthead Amplifier Internals

The outside box is made of hard plastic and seems to have a manufacture date stamped on the inside of May 1993. The electronics inside the box is quite simple and certainly has none of the adjustable gains and/or removable links that most of the newer models have. However that doesn't mean it's not perfectly suited to the job..... The electronics inside case is all made of aluminium.

Can anyone identify the amplifier and what its' specifications are...

Thanks.

#19 Peter G

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Posted 07 January 2007 - 10:19 AM

The Antenna in the photo is a Hills PF17.
Haven't seen that type of masthead box before.

#20 steveinqld

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Posted 07 January 2007 - 06:58 PM

The Antenna in the photo is a Hills PF17.
Haven't seen that type of masthead box before.


If what you say is true, the Hills PF17 is for VHF channels 1-11 and UHF 28-34.
That would explain why I can get digital 11 ans 12 but poor reception on 36, 37, 38.

Any recommendations for a new antenna that I can straight swap out with my existing and still get analogue 7,9,28,31 and 34.

Can I also still sue my existing masthead amplifier until we prove otherwise??

Steve

#21 alanh

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Posted 07 January 2007 - 07:28 PM

steveinqld,
The antenna you have uses a lot of its metal work for channels for channel 2 which is unused in Rockhampton. So the PF17 was unsuitable from the start.

If you get a band 3 & 4+ antenna (see my link in pinned post above) will get you all stations analog and digital and the future channel allocations. If you look at my table for Rockhampton The ABC is on channel 9 and WIN is on channel 7. These are all in band 3.

The amplifier you have photographed is much lower gain than the Kingray MHW44 series. They have separate V & U gain if you get too much signal.

I would suggest you get separate Band 3 & band 4+ antennas. The Kingray MHW44 series have separate inputs for VHF & UHF including band 4+.

The reason your UHF signal is poor is because there is more loss in the cable on the higher channels, any wet foliage absorbs more of the signal.

I would suggest to you that you buy a band 4+ Yagi such as the Hills TCX20 and connect it to the down lead without the amplifier and see what you can get. If satisfactory then add a Hills DY10 through a diplexer. If not replace the diplexer with Kingray Masthead amplifier. The amplifier should be mounted a metre below the lowest antenna.

I suggest you read Antenna Design Basics + Amplification, Terms and comparison of types

Masthead Amplifier Survey, Must include filtering

AlanH

#22 steveinqld

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Posted 07 January 2007 - 09:23 PM

Thanks for the advise alanh, I will go away and source the antennas and amplifier and power supply.

One final question though,

I'd rather spend a little bit extra money now (if it's warranted) to get the best picture and never have to worry about it again.

That said, would you still suggest the DY10 and TMX20 (or TCX20.. what's the difference?).

Also I looked through the Kingray Masthead amplifier range and see I could choose 34 F,FS or G or the 38G, then my next choice is power supply - PSK02, 06 or 08 (each with different voltages AC or DC and corresponding changes in gain vs noise tradeoff????). Can you make life easier for me and suggest which amplifier and power supply combination is the best for my application?

#23 alanh

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Posted 08 January 2007 - 08:43 PM

steveinqld,
The Hills DY10 is for ABC & WIN. The Hills TMX20 is for the rest of the stations. This will cover the two spare channels for the future. TMX will cost more but the sensitivity to channels 28-50 will be better. Since cyclones are possible, I would also get the optional centre support brace.

The Kingray MHW34FS would be best, say you want it with its power supply. 17 VAC is best because corrosion is limited, this way.

In all cases you will need F connectors put on the end of the cables between the antenna and the amplifier. You will also need one on the end of the cable going into the house.

The F connectors come in two sizes depending on the cable. Make sure you have a drip loop to stop water getting into the amplifier.

I would replace the cable from the antenna, through the amplifier to inside the roof at least with Quad shielded RG6. Your existing cable could be sun affected. Make sure the cable is well secured with out crushing the cable and the bends are not too tight.

You weakest signal will be during heavy rain.

AlanH

#24 geesey

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Posted 08 January 2007 - 09:31 PM

steveinqld,
The Hills DY10 is for ABC & WIN. The Hills TMX20 is for the rest of the stations. This will cover the two spare channels for the future. TMX will cost more but the sensitivity to channels 28-50 will be better. Since cyclones are possible, I would also get the optional centre support brace.

The Kingray MHW34FS would be best, say you want it with its power supply. 17 VAC is best because corrosion is limited, this way.

In all cases you will need F connectors put on the end of the cables between the antenna and the amplifier. You will also need one on the end of the cable going into the house.

The F connectors come in two sizes depending on the cable. Make sure you have a drip loop to stop water getting into the amplifier.

I would replace the cable from the antenna, through the amplifier to inside the roof at least with Quad shielded RG6. Your existing cable could be sun affected. Make sure the cable is well secured with out crushing the cable and the bends are not too tight.

You weakest signal will be during heavy rain.

AlanH

What aerial would you suggest in Townsville?. I still need the analogue channels as well as the digitals.
I am having the most problems with digital channels 36 (Ten), 37 (SBS) and 38 (Seven).
I can't tune Channel Nine analogue (40). This is perplexing as I get perfect reception on Digital 41 (Nine).
I am thinking from the chart a Band 3 & 4+ antenna would be best.
Thanks

#25 steveinqld

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Posted 08 January 2007 - 10:50 PM

steveinqld,

The Kingray MHW34FS would be best, say you want it with its power supply. 17 VAC is best because corrosion is limited, this way.


I understand that AC reduces corrosion vs DC, but why the 17.5V AC supply over the 22V AC?

You weakest signal will be during heavy rain.
AlanH


Heavy Rain? Hah, that's not something we've had to worry about here for about a year!

Steve