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Hisense Hd Tv Calibration Needed!


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#1 sharp_1

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Posted 19 June 2012 - 01:25 PM

Can someone please post a calibration that they use for Blu-Rays on Hisense HD TVs please!

I have a 55" LED Hisense HD TV myself, and for Blu-Ray the TV automatically changes to "Dymatic" mode which boosts the backlight at 100 and all the other picture settings (sharpness, colour, brightness, contrast) at 50. I know for a fact this ISN'T how Blu-Ray is suppose to look because even though it looks "nice" in the sense that the picture pops off the screen, I am a purist when it comes to Blu-Ray. I want the movies to look preserved and look like actual FILM, not like a VIDEO GAME

So can anyone tell me what picture settings they use for there Hisense HD TV whist playing Blu-Ray? So what level on 'user mode' do you have the sharpness, colour, brightness,contrast & backlight settings on???? I would very much like to replicate it if you don't mind.

This is a link to my model - http://www.hisense.c...led/type/38/209

#2 jsmith

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Posted 19 June 2012 - 05:20 PM

Can someone please post a calibration that they use for Blu-Rays on Hisense HD TVs please!

I have a 55" LED Hisense HD TV myself, and for Blu-Ray the TV automatically changes to "Dymatic" mode which boosts the backlight at 100 and all the other picture settings (sharpness, colour, brightness, contrast) at 50. I know for a fact this ISN'T how Blu-Ray is suppose to look because even though it looks "nice" in the sense that the picture pops off the screen, I am a purist when it comes to Blu-Ray. I want the movies to look preserved and look like actual FILM, not like a VIDEO GAME

So can anyone tell me what picture settings they use for there Hisense HD TV whist playing Blu-Ray? So what level on 'user mode' do you have the sharpness, colour, brightness,contrast & backlight settings on???? I would very much like to replicate it if you don't mind.

This is a link to my model - http://www.hisense.c...led/type/38/209


Mate it's hard to say as each model is different in it's settings, and often individual screens with the same model number are a little different too.

I got this Spears and Munsil Bluray with my Oppo, and it is very thorough so you could buy that. There are also some free test patterns online to use, but that relies on a PC being connected or possibly viewing them via a USB. Some movies like Star Wars have a THX calibration at the beginning of the disc, this is also quite helpful.

There are calibration tools you can use too like the Spyder, but probably getting a bit pricey for you.

Best of luck.

JSmith :ninja:

#3 Owen

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Posted 20 June 2012 - 10:38 AM

I have not seen the Hisense but dont need to to make the following suggestions as they apply to pretty much all TV's.

Most TV's have preset picture modes like Dynamic, Standard, Movie etc, you should select the most appropriate one (normally Movie or Cinema) as a starting point, but which ever mode you choose it needs to be adjustable. You may need to select a User mode to get adjusability.

Most TV's also have colour preset modes like Cool, Normal and Warm which define colour balance (the colour of the grey scale). The "Warm" mode is normally the most accurate, other modes typically are much to heavy in blue.

LCD TV's (NOT Plasmas) should have the Contrast control set as high as possible before loss of detail or discolouration of white highlights occurs. A grey scale ramp test pattern that shows shades of grey stepping down from full white is very helpful as it lets you see if all shades of grey are visible and if there is any discolouration at or near full white, if there is Contrast should be lowered just far enough to eliminate any issues.

The light output of an LCD is controlled by the back/edge light intensity, it needs to be set at an appropriate level for the viewing environment, brighter for bright rooms and dimmer for dark rooms. Be conservative here as over bright settings give the picture an artificial look and contribute the viewer fatigue.
Most LCD TV's adjust the back/edge light dynamicly to improve apparent contrast but this dynamic behaviour leads to inconstant picture quality, loss of shadow detail and fluctuating black level, all of which can be very annoying. If its possible to disable this dynamic dimming I would do so.

The "Brightness" control is oddly named as it sets the black level of the display. Adjustment is simple, display a wide screen movie with black bars above and below the image, preferable a dark scene. Alternatively a black title screen with little or no text can be used. Adjust the Brightness control up until the black bars turn grey, then adjust down one step at a time until the black level just stops getting any darker and you are done. No test disk is required, its really that simple.
Since your eyes ability to see dark shades of grey varies depending on ambient room lighting different Brightness settings will be needed for bright and dark viewing environments.

The "Colour" control sets the intensity of colour, the only way to set this is by eye over a period of time viewing a large range of content. You are looking for a good average, there is no perfect setting.

Sharpness is a picture "enhancement", for best quality is should be turned off or kept at a low setting. Higher settings increase visible noise, compression artefacts and give the picture a harsh digital look. If the picture is not sharp trying to make it sharp with the sharpness control will cause more problems than its worth.

Gamma is a sticky subject and its impossible to adjust properly without measurement equipment. If the TV has gamma presets all you can do is use the one you like best.
Be aware that gamma adjustments interacts with the Brightness setting so you should readjust the Brightness control after altering gamma.

That pretty much covers it, all thats left is grey scale/white point adjustment, that requires a colour meter and I dont recommend you attempt to adjust by eye, amusing the TV even gives you the controls outside the service menu. The "Warm" colour preset is generally close enough.

After doing the above your LCD will be set up as best as possible without spending money on calibration gear or a pro calibration so sit back and enjoy. :D

Edited by Owen, 20 June 2012 - 11:15 AM.


#4 fredofrog

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Posted 24 June 2012 - 02:37 PM

On a slightly different issue, how is the Hisense to use? I went into JB today and saw the 55inch next to one of the bigger brands and it did seem fine by comparison and about $1000 cheaper (than Samsung). Does it have a 1 or 3 yr warranty and other than the calibration is it working well?

I was looking at them about 4/5 years ago but I went with Panasonic instead.

#5 butterfingers

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Posted 05 August 2012 - 03:59 PM

i got a hisense factory refurbed 55" led (all in the box looking new and unused) from ebay for $700 from a wholesaler 6 months back. its one of the best value purchases i have ever made. i love it. it only has a 1 year warranty as a refurbished unit, but brand new has 3 years. my ex has an over 3 year old 55" lcd model and its still going fine. the picture is fine. i cant pick any faults that arent present on a tv at double the price or more.